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Found 2 Huge Umbra Limi today.


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#1 Guest_tglassburner_*

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 12:22 AM

Found 2 5"+ Musminnows today. First time I have ever seen a specimen this large. Found them in 2 different locales and 2 different HUCs

Gonna put them in my small pond in the spring with the normal size ones and see if they breed.

#2 Michael Wolfe

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 12:42 PM

Tom it looks like you tried to link us to a picture that we cannot access... I even tried copying the link you provided and going there direct... got an access forbidden kind of message.
Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin

#3 Guest_Orangespotted_*

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 03:05 PM

Yeah, I can't see it either.

#4 Guest_butch_*

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 04:39 PM

It's sad that we can't see the image :(.....speaking of the huge mudminnows, I once found a huge central mudminnow that must be 7-8" mixed in the white suckers at the bait store few years ago. 3-4" is norm size for the central mudminnows here.

#5 Guest_tglassburner_*

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 05:06 PM

Let's see if this works. I attached it to this post
.Posted Image

Edited by tglassburner, 08 December 2013 - 05:08 PM.


#6 Guest_tglassburner_*

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 05:12 PM

Also I cannot imagine that these larger fish are specifically male as I was told yesterday because that would mean in all the 100s of mudminnows I've collected and or seen that there were only 2 males found. Why would there be the need to grow this large in a population of smaller adults? Either way come spring they are going in my pond, where they will hopefully eventually breed wth the other mudminnows and have giant offspring! Photo does not do them justice. They are over 5" each.

Edited by tglassburner, 08 December 2013 - 05:12 PM.


#7 Michael Wolfe

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 05:35 PM

there's not a lot there for frame of reference... but you can see in the shape of the head/mouth that the fish is much bigger than "normal"
Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin

#8 Guest_tglassburner_*

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 06:30 PM

This help a little?
Same white bucket in both images.

Posted Image
Posted Image

#9 Guest_butch_*

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 07:15 PM

Maybe it has do with their age related to their size? In most populations of fish in general, there is always a giant or two in each population. I can't tell you how many giants I've found in different species. Seen few giant gambusia, included a giant male that is same size as their female counterpart, a thick 4" male fathead minnow, a 12" common shiner, a 12" stoneroller, a 6" orange spotted sunfish and few 4" brook sticklebacks that you can use them for pike bait.

#10 Guest_Skipjack_*

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 04:19 PM

Tom, I think this is what is happening. It is a function of age. These are the rare mudminnows that live long past their expected lifespan. Occam's razor. This is certainly the simple explanation.

#11 Guest_Uland_*

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 08:08 PM

Tom,
Looks like you found a solid large U limi.
In some locations I sample, sporadic juveniles are to be found and you'll even see adults in nuptial condition at 3.5". I also sample locations where they are the most abundant fish to be found. In both of these situations, you'll find large 5"~6" fish if you dig hard enough. Naturally your odds increase if you're in a location where they are abundant.

I find very large adults are easiest to find immediately after the ice breaks (March in Northern Illinois) in less than 4" of water in heavy vegetation. Many specimens are quite ragged and possibly near death.



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