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What's the smallest predatory fish we have?


9 replies to this topic

#1 Betta132

Betta132
  • NANFA Guest
  • San Gabriel drainage area

Posted 23 March 2015 - 11:31 AM

I don't have an open tank, this is research for a future plan. 

What's the smallest native predatory fish that actually looks like a predator? As in, any random person can look at it and say "Oh, that looks like a hunter." I'm looking for something maybe along the lines of a pickerel, and I'd prefer if it was something native to Texas or a nearby state. I'm really just looking for something that doesn't need a very large tank, preferably something I can train onto frozen foods. 



#2 Matt DeLaVega

Matt DeLaVega
  • Board of Directors
  • Ohio

Posted 23 March 2015 - 11:46 AM

Mudminnow.


The member formerly known as Skipjack


#3 smbass

smbass
  • Board of Directors

Posted 23 March 2015 - 11:48 AM

or a sculpin but mudminnow is a great suggestion. Sculpin warm temps become a concern.


Brian J. Zimmerman

Gambier, Ohio - Kokosing River Drainage


#4 UncleWillie

UncleWillie
  • NANFA Guest

Posted 23 March 2015 - 12:02 PM

I would agree that mudminnow is a great suggestion (particularly when you consider its closeness to pickerel).  I would hate myself if I didn't at least bring up pirate perch.  They certainly have that predator look - big mouth, small body.  Although some may consider them to be a bore in a tank, I had a blast keeping them.  They were trained on soft pellets, but they certainly got a weekly helping of Gambusia or field crickets.  Watching a pirate perch emerge from vegetation to stalk a Gambusia is very cool.  http://www.nanfa.org...rateperch.shtml


Willie Pruitt
Chattahoochee River, GA


#5 Michael Wolfe

Michael Wolfe
  • Board of Directors
  • North Georgia, Oconee River Drainage

Posted 23 March 2015 - 12:03 PM

Mud minnows are the best choice. But since you said pickerel, I will say that I had a Redfin do quite well alone in a 25 gallon bow front for several years. But they are mostly like owning a statue, except for when you add food. Very still.
Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin

#6 butch

butch
  • NANFA Guest

Posted 23 March 2015 - 04:24 PM

Pike livebearers and some large killifish species are few of smaller predatory fishes.

#7 Betta132

Betta132
  • NANFA Guest
  • San Gabriel drainage area

Posted 23 March 2015 - 09:21 PM

Pike livebearers look awesome! Plus, they're smallish, so they'd be suitable for a community of larger oddball fishes. 



#8 Sean Phillips

Sean Phillips
  • NANFA Member
  • Allegheny River Drainage, Southwest PA

Posted 24 March 2015 - 06:13 AM

Pike livebearers look awesome! Plus, they're smallish, so they'd be suitable for a community of larger oddball fishes.


Not native, though. I'd have to go with mudminnows as well for most predatory for its size.
Sean Phillips - Pine Creek Watershed - Allegheny River Drainage

#9 Yeahson421

Yeahson421
  • NANFA Member
  • Driftless Region - SE MN

Posted 24 March 2015 - 07:22 AM

What is really great about Mudminnows is that they are predatory but also suitable for a community tank. They are a really interesting specues to have in an aquarium.

3,000-4,000 Gallon Pond Full of all sorts of spawning fishes! http://forum.nanfa.org/index.php/topic/13811-3560-gallon-native-fish-pond/page-3 

 


#10 trygon

trygon
  • NANFA Guest
  • Knoxville, Tennessee

Posted 24 March 2015 - 09:37 PM

Belonesox is a North American native, they occur well north of the Yucatan Peninsula.  There is an invasive population in south Florida that has there since the late '50s or early '60s.


Bryce Gibson
There are sharks in every ocean...except Billy Ocean.



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