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How to keep crawfish


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#1 Crazyblade1209

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  • Limington, Maine

Posted 21 May 2015 - 07:03 AM

I've tried repeatedly to keep crayfish but I cannot seem to do so. I do remember a few summers ago I had a tank on my porch that I would throw any I caught in my trap in as bait. They seemed to last most of the summer. Now I have a real tank setup and I cannot seem to be able to sustain them. They last about 2 days then die. Any advice?



#2 gerald

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  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 21 May 2015 - 09:21 AM

Need more info on what exactly you've been doing that is not working.  Are you using dechlorinated water?  Are they possibly getting oxygen-stressed or overheated during transport home?  Is there a cycled filter or growing plants in the tank?


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#3 Crazyblade1209

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  • Limington, Maine

Posted 21 May 2015 - 09:49 AM

I am using dechlorinated water, I'm treating and its from my personal well so the tap water is significantly cleaner than normal "city water" would be and I live in the country so that helps as well. Im sure they aren't getting overheated as I got them from a stream 5 minutes away and brought them home in a 5 gallon bucket with water from the stream. The filter is cycled and there are no plants, just a few rocks. I have no idea what oxygen stress is so you'll have to enlighten me haha. I had also heard they needed to be able to get out of the water or they will drown? not sure about it so when I made my new tank I made sure it was a low level tank with rocks they can easily crawl out on.



#4 gerald

gerald
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  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 21 May 2015 - 11:54 AM

Sorry I meant LOW-oxygen stress (too crowded, too warm, or not enough air/water surface area).  Sounds like that was not the problem in your case.  As long as the water has enough oxygen they don't need to climb out, and will not "drown" -- they are gill-breathers.  The so-called "drowning" is simply suffocation from being held in water with too little dissolved oxygen, too much ammonia, or too much CO2.  In that case they WILL climb out of water to get more oxygen to their gills.  I dont know why they're dying so quickly.  Certain species require cool water, much like trout and sculpins.  Do you know what kind they are, and are they from streams that stay cool year-round?


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#5 Josh Blaylock

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Posted 21 May 2015 - 11:59 AM

65e2295e42b22833b2c1c8c8d45e2d8bee15e6ac


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#6 centrarchid

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Posted 21 May 2015 - 01:09 PM

Do you have someone spraying for insects around your home?  We cannot keep arthropods of any sort alive in our lab because of insecticide use.


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#7 Betta132

Betta132
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  • San Gabriel drainage area

Posted 21 May 2015 - 02:33 PM

Is there any sort of spray being used in the area? 

If not, you may be overcomplicating things. Try a very simple setup: cycled tank, rocks, airstone for oxygen, maybe some moss or something, and nothing else. 



#8 UncleWillie

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Posted 21 May 2015 - 03:50 PM

One question that hasn't been raised is: are you acclimating the crayfish to the tank?  Make sure that you are acclimating them (just as you would a fish) so there is no "shock" when being moved from the stream water to tank water.  Water chemistry and temperature between the stream and tank may be completely different.  A quick search about acclimating fish should answer any questions about this.  I am always overly cautious and do a very long, slow acclimation for my fish/crays.


Willie P
Roswell, GA


#9 Riffledace

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  • Massachusetts

Posted 21 May 2015 - 09:08 PM

Perhaps your well water has something nasty occurring naturally in it, like arsenic.

#10 Crazyblade1209

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  • Limington, Maine

Posted 21 May 2015 - 09:11 PM

I have been acclimating them but possibly not for long enough? And as far as I know nothing is being sprayed. I think maybe I need more water flow/oxygenation? I came home and the new batch I put in were all belly up. They had been fine for around 2 days. Also it may be too crowded. 

 

Sorry I meant LOW-oxygen stress (too crowded, too warm, or not enough air/water surface area).  Sounds like that was not the problem in your case.  As long as the water has enough oxygen they don't need to climb out, and will not "drown" -- they are gill-breathers.  The so-called "drowning" is simply suffocation from being held in water with too little dissolved oxygen, too much ammonia, or too much CO2.  In that case they WILL climb out of water to get more oxygen to their gills.  I dont know why they're dying so quickly.  Certain species require cool water, much like trout and sculpins.  Do you know what kind they are, and are they from streams that stay cool year-round?

I do not know the species but I can get some pictures at some point tomorrow and maybe someone on here will know. 



#11 Evan P

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  • Knoxville, TN

Posted 21 May 2015 - 09:57 PM

IT could be copper poisoning as well. Invertebrates are incredibly sensitive to cppper in their water.
3,000-4,000 Gallon Pond Full of all sorts of spawning fishes! http://forum.nanfa.org/index.php/topic/13811-3560-gallon-native-fish-pond/page-3 
 

#12 fishlvr

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  • Savannah, GA

Posted 22 May 2015 - 06:53 AM

Is there anything abnormal anout them when they die (hair-like strands coming off them, limbs falling off for no reason, etc)? Also it would help to know what species you have, as crays like Procambarus clarkii can almost survive in battery acid and other species can't take anything other than perfect water.
Steve Knight

Lower Ogeechee/Ogeechee Coastal Drainage

#13 centrarchid

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Posted 22 May 2015 - 06:57 AM

Try using activated carbon to remove toxic metals while water aged prior to putting in tank.


Find ways for people not already interested in natives to value them.

#14 Crazyblade1209

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  • Limington, Maine

Posted 22 May 2015 - 09:07 AM

Is there anything abnormal anout them when they die (hair-like strands coming off them, limbs falling off for no reason, etc)? Also it would help to know what species you have, as crays like Procambarus clarkii can almost survive in battery acid and other species can't take anything other than perfect water.

 

There is nothing abnormal they just seem to kind of end up on their backs with their legs/claws pointed inwards. Ive also been looking at types of crayfish and I think they may be papershell crayfish.



#15 Crazyblade1209

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  • Limington, Maine

Posted 28 May 2015 - 08:34 PM

Here are pics. Any help Identifying will be appreciated.

 

Attached File  20150528_211548.jpg   73.65KB   2 downloads

Attached File  20150522_170948.jpg   86.35KB   1 downloads






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