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6th Annual Everglades CISMA Non-Native Fish Round Up Results


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#1 rc6750

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 12:54 PM

http://www.everglade...ma.org/roundup/

 

"The 6th Annual Everglades Non-Native Fish Round Up had a total of 52 anglers. In total, 1,062 fish (16 different species) were caught with an overall aggregate weight of 545 pounds."

 

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#2 butch

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 06:35 PM

I'm more concerned about what they do with all fish they have?

#3 rc6750

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 08:49 PM

Says on the page:

All the caught fish will be donated to lifenet4families

#4 Michael Wolfe

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 08:59 PM

Looks like a nice event... I do however, notice that none of the listed champions had the inititals RC?


Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin

#5 Betta132

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 02:21 AM

Is that guy in the first pic a piranha? If so, I have yet another reason to not go to Florida. 

How did they catch the plecos? I don't think those guys would bite onto a hook, and I'm not certain it would be possible to hook one anyway. 

That is a LOT of plecos. I know it wouldn't make a huge difference at this point, but I'd support some kind of limit on sailfin plecos for aquariums. Maybe not a complete ban, just something like having to purchase a (reasonably inexpensive) licence to keep them. I wouldn't support limiting all pleco species- a lot of them actually stay small (5" or so) and won't outgrow a tank, which means they won't be dumped, but there are a few that top out at 18" and are very commonly sold. Heck, maybe even an outright ban in the states where they might possibly become established- it's only a couple of species that are problematic 



#6 littlen

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 07:26 AM

Betta---I think it is more, "Pacu-ish".  My guess, with as common as they are in the pet trade is, Piaractus brachypomus.  Although, piranhas, pacus, and silverdollars are all part of the Characin order.  To include tetras as well.  So a lot of close relatives in a big family.  Piranha usually have a pretty strong underbite.  Nonetheless, you absolutely do not want to be bitten by a pacu, either.

I have no idea either how they caught all the plecos.  I'm guessing a baited trap?  


Nick L.

#7 rc6750

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 07:52 AM

Looks like a nice event... I do however, notice that none of the listed champions had the inititals RC?

 

haha true, next year!

 

 

Betta---I think it is more, "Pacu-ish".  My guess, with as common as they are in the pet trade is, Piaractus brachypomus.  Although, piranhas, pacus, and silverdollars are all part of the Characin order.  To include tetras as well.  So a lot of close relatives in a big family.  Piranha usually have a pretty strong underbite.  Nonetheless, you absolutely do not want to be bitten by a pacu, either.

I have no idea either how they caught all the plecos.  I'm guessing a baited trap?  

 

I would say Pacu as well - River Monsters had an episode about them. Although I haven't caught one yet, It is possible to catch plecos on hook and line. I have friends who have done it with tiny bits of worm, or tiny bits of worm flecked with algae. It is definitely challenging and I am not sure how all of those were caught.The rules stipulate that they must follow FWC regulations for fishing and you can only use certain size traps for minnows in freshwater so who knows.



#8 butch

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 08:50 AM

Is that guy in the first pic a piranha? If so, I have yet another reason to not go to Florida. 
How did they catch the plecos? I don't think those guys would bite onto a hook, and I'm not certain it would be possible to hook one anyway. 
That is a LOT of plecos. I know it wouldn't make a huge difference at this point, but I'd support some kind of limit on sailfin plecos for aquariums. Maybe not a complete ban, just something like having to purchase a (reasonably inexpensive) licence to keep them. I wouldn't support limiting all pleco species- a lot of them actually stay small (5" or so) and won't outgrow a tank, which means they won't be dumped, but there are a few that top out at 18" and are very commonly sold. Heck, maybe even an outright ban in the states where they might possibly become established- it's only a couple of species that are problematic 

too late to close the barn doors after the horses left. It would be impossible to wipe the plecos out entirely at this point.

#9 Matt DeLaVega

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 03:05 PM

too late to close the barn doors after the horses left. It would be impossible to wipe the plecos out entirely at this point.

Yeah, the whole thing is probably fairly unproductive as far as removing invasives. However from an educational standpoint it seems great. Spread the word, might ultimately slow the population growth. Fingers crossed anyway.

 

I would guess that those pleco types are no more difficult to catch than out native suckers. Get the right thing in the right place. Just because they suck glass in aquaria does not mean that they spit a nice easy protein filled worm in a stream. Just a guess.


The member formerly known as Skipjack


#10 butch

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 05:56 PM

As long as the uneducated hobbyists are still around, that problem won't go away. We got some calls from people about an alligator being loose around every year. I've found that metro areas are perfect habitat for many invasive species. Our metro lakes/ponds have few surprises for us every time we sampled in them. Pacus, plecos, koi, fancy goldfish, Oscars, parrot cichlids and one time a saltwater green damsel fish.

#11 Matt DeLaVega

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 06:32 PM

Try optimism. Maybe a difference can be made, I may have too much faith in humanity, but I prefer giving it a shot.


The member formerly known as Skipjack


#12 Betta132

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Posted 24 September 2015 - 09:02 PM

I was thinking more of restricting/banning invasive plecos in places where they aren't completely established yet. At the very least, it might help prevent new populations from being established. Florida is already pleco habitat (and anaconda habitat, and nile moniter habitat, even betta habitat in one spot), but Texas is warm enough for plecos and isn't completely infested. We do have a couple of populations, yes, but most of the rivers/lakes/etc are pleco-free.

Perhaps someone should start a petition asking pet store owners to put up a sign near their fish section. Something along the lines of "Do not release fish, even if they become aggressive or grow larger than expected. It is bad for the environment because [reasons], and it is illegal" might do the trick. 

 

I've seen that River Monsters episode. I also would like to avoid pacu, though I'm pretty sure it's easy to tell if a lake has starving pacu in it. Just look for the lake with absolutely no plant life, and keep an eye out for ducks/snakes/baby 'gators/etc being dragged under the surface and torn apart by trash-can-sized chunks of human-toothed muscle.

 

A green damsel in a lake? Weird. Did you end up taking it to someone with a saltwater tank? 


Edited by Betta132, 24 September 2015 - 09:05 PM.


#13 don212

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 07:53 AM

many stores will take unwanted fish, for instance, plecos originally bought for aquariums can be resold to koi pond owners when they outgrow an aquarium, i don't know why they don't take credit for this service, by putting up a sign saying don't release them , bring them to us.






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