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*Two* fantail darter morphs in Indiana?


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#1 millionk

millionk
  • NANFA Member
  • Bloomington, IN

Posted 09 November 2015 - 06:49 PM

Hi,

 

Last Wednesday I went seining in Clear Creek just outside of Bloomington, IN.  I collected 14 fantail darters, but observed two different morphs: barred (E. f. flabellare) and striped (E. f. lineolatum).  Tom Simon's Indiana fishes field manual has them listed as two subspecies of flabellare, but I can't find out much more about them.  Does anyone know how divergent from one another they really are?  I was hoping to run some experiments soon, but I might have to pick between the two subspecies for the project if I can't pool them together as a single population.



#2 Matt DeLaVega

Matt DeLaVega
  • Board of Directors
  • Ohio

Posted 09 November 2015 - 07:42 PM

Lost on them too. Still the same species as far as I know. Trautman had them split 40 years ago in Fishes of Ohio. Don't think it was ever accepted. I buy it myself.


The member formerly known as Skipjack


#3 gerald

gerald
  • Global Moderator
  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 10 November 2015 - 08:55 AM

You might just be seeing normal variation within a population.  We have 2 "recognized subspecies" of fantail darters in the Atlantic river drainages in the Carolinas (humerale and brevispinum) and I see lots of variation in bars & striped patterns within both of them, even at sites where only one of the two forms is supposed to occur.


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#4 millionk

millionk
  • NANFA Member
  • Bloomington, IN

Posted 10 November 2015 - 05:24 PM

Well they don't seem to vary much in gill parasite load, so I guess it will be okay for what I want to do.



#5 millionk

millionk
  • NANFA Member
  • Bloomington, IN

Posted 11 November 2015 - 10:30 AM

Well, Tom Simon weighed in and said that it's unlikely the subspecies would co-occur, so I probably have two color morphs of the same species.  Whew.  That makes things much easier.



#6 fundulus

fundulus
  • Global Moderator

Posted 11 November 2015 - 01:13 PM

I assume these fantails carry many, many monogenoideans?


Bruce Stallsmith, Huntsville, Alabama, US of A

#7 millionk

millionk
  • NANFA Member
  • Bloomington, IN

Posted 11 November 2015 - 04:50 PM

You would be correct: 100% prevalence, and high abundance as well.  One individual had 40 of them.





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