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Stickleback food


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#1 9darlingcalvi

9darlingcalvi
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  • Moorhead,MN

Posted 06 February 2016 - 08:23 PM

I was wondering if sticklebacks, the brook or nine would eat the following.
Mosquito larva
Midge larva
Tubifex worms
Scuds
Aquatic amphipods
Water mites
Springtails
Damselfly larva
Mayfly larva
Ostracods
Clam shrimp
Copepods or
Daphnia

#2 gzeiger

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Posted 06 February 2016 - 08:56 PM

Lucky fish. Mayflies and damselflies may be too large on average, but the rest are unquestionably excellent choices if they are available.



#3 9darlingcalvi

9darlingcalvi
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  • Moorhead,MN

Posted 06 February 2016 - 09:11 PM

Okay, I have a pond that has all of these in the spring summer and winter. I will have to find something to feed them in the wonter

#4 gzeiger

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Posted 06 February 2016 - 09:48 PM

If you're very ambitious, there are several aquatic worms that can be cultured. Blackworms are the most readily available, but starter cultures of others can usually be found on Ebay. Daphnia and ostracods can also be cultured. I would just use frozen food. Sticklebacks are small, but they can eat brine shrimp and baby mysis or several other readily available choices.



#5 Michael Wolfe

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  • North Georgia, Oconee River Drainage

Posted 07 February 2016 - 08:46 AM

EVERYTHING eats mosquito larva, and that's easy in the warmer months.  But those are not what you want to try to keep over the winter... on the other hand, I would think it would be easy enough to keep scuds and clam shrimp alive in a tank.


Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin

#6 9darlingcalvi

9darlingcalvi
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Posted 07 February 2016 - 09:36 AM

Could I seed the tank 2 months before I add the stickle backs? Also for breeding could I put a female in a breeding box while the male us in the 10 gallon?

#7 Michael Wolfe

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  • North Georgia, Oconee River Drainage

Posted 07 February 2016 - 12:32 PM

I am not convinced that any "seeding" of a tank that the fish are going to live in ever works... fish will eat you out of a culture.  The only time I ever heard of that working was the blackworms that Erika got established in a 55 gallon tank with Elassoma (very big tank for a very small tank).  And I am not convinced that it was really self sustaining... maybe just declining slowly.


Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin

#8 gzeiger

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Posted 07 February 2016 - 03:26 PM

I'm sure it was sustainable when she had 6 pygmy sunfish in a 55 gallon tank with a pound of worms, but the fish population eventually increased until the worms were extinct.

 

In a 10 gallon I don't think the reproduction rate of any culture will match what one stickleback can eat. Seeding a tank does help acclimate fish, though, allowing them to eat when not under stress from seeing you standing there, eat throughout the day, and better mimic natural behaviors.

 

I still think frozen is the way to go unless you're very over-the-top dedicated to the project. And I say that as a guy that is just finishing up a thousand gallon custom tank that took 4 months to build. I don't have the dedication for worm cultures.



#9 Michael Wolfe

Michael Wolfe
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Posted 07 February 2016 - 06:23 PM

I agree with you there gzeiger.  Also, while I know there is a benefit to having "natural" behavior... there is also a benefit to having the fish learn to associate you with food.  It makes them more willing to try new foods and  brings timid fish forward for you to see them (observe their physical condition and assure their health).


Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin

#10 Matt DeLaVega

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Posted 07 February 2016 - 06:49 PM

Sticklebacks could do well on various cyprinids. Put enough Pimephales in the tank, and their wounds should heal regularly. Joking- sort of.


The member formerly known as Skipjack


#11 9darlingcalvi

9darlingcalvi
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Posted 07 February 2016 - 07:18 PM

Oh, okay




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