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Central Mudminnow


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#1 9darlingcalvi

9darlingcalvi
  • NANFA Guest
  • Moorhead,MN

Posted 22 February 2016 - 07:32 AM

I was wondering if a central mudminnow could live with Iowa darters in a 10 gallon aqaurIum

#2 gerald

gerald
  • Global Moderator
  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 22 February 2016 - 10:16 AM

Maybe when they're small, but adult mudminnows might eat slim-bodied darters.  Also you'll need to feed often to make sure the darters get enough food; Umbra are more aggressive feeders.


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#3 Sean Phillips

Sean Phillips
  • NANFA Member
  • Allegheny River Drainage, Southwest PA

Posted 22 February 2016 - 10:21 AM

I would say so, most of them, anyway. I was able to net a few over 4" last spring and one that was 6" so at that point you have to treat them more as small Pikes.
Sean Phillips - Pine Creek Watershed - Allegheny River Drainage

#4 9darlingcalvi

9darlingcalvi
  • NANFA Guest
  • Moorhead,MN

Posted 22 February 2016 - 03:26 PM

so, none at all? okay, I just liked the way they acted. it there a fish like that and could work in a ten gallon with darters



#5 smbass

smbass
  • Board of Directors

Posted 24 February 2016 - 06:03 PM

Size taken into consideration these two can live together. If you start with younger fish of both species and keep them well fed I would have a hard time believing the mudminnows would ever get large enough to eat the darters. Will take mudminnows a long time to get 4-5" and if the darters also live that long they will push 3 inches. Should be no problem to keep them together.


Brian J. Zimmerman

Gambier, Ohio - Kokosing River Drainage


#6 Irate Mormon

Irate Mormon
  • NANFA Member
  • Crooked Creek, Mississippi

Posted 25 February 2016 - 12:31 AM

I would say, sir, that you are in need of not ONE, but several 10 gallon tanks.  That would eliminate the question of who could safely live with whom. 

 

This is how one ends up with a fish room.


-Martin
 
Neither Mormon, nor particularly Irate. 
 
Turning money into noise!


#7 gzeiger

gzeiger
  • NANFA Guest

Posted 25 February 2016 - 05:42 PM

I used to think that way too, Irate, but ultimately the ten gallons were too small and I had to build a thousand.



#8 Matt DeLaVega

Matt DeLaVega
  • Board of Directors
  • Ohio

Posted 26 February 2016 - 09:11 PM

I don't look at it that way. Irate is tough to get, but not the enemy. lets try to not make a big deal of it.Laugh at his jokes.   

 

  But screw him when the games are beyond what you know of him. Bet he will fix that.


The member formerly known as Skipjack


#9 Nightwing

Nightwing
  • NANFA Member

Posted 22 March 2016 - 12:59 PM

I have kept Iowa and Rainbow darters with CM's, with no problems even as the mudminnows approached 6-8 inches.  I keep a very large(130) gallon tank full of rocks, logs, plants, caves, tannic water...so even with a dozen MM's I've not seen losses with them.  Currently with a half dozen or so MM's ranging from 3-7 inches in length, I have a dozen or so dace and HAVE lost a few of the small ones...but I'm honestly  not sure to "what".  My tank is very native, using locally sourced substrate(read, pond mud), plants, logs, rocks, all from local lakes/ponds, and with such you get a lot of life..some of it not very fish friendly.  Draggonfly nymphs come to mind.  I try and keep them out, and fish them out when I can...but several times per year I come home to dragonflys darting about my apartment..so I suspect the lost dace have run afoul of them, and not the MM's.  Oddly...since I know how many MM's started out in the tank, even though some were as small as an inch I've never lost any so not sure if they are just lucky or better able to sense and avoide the dragons..   I love CMM's, they are I swear from an alternate reality where pickerel and cichids got it on and they are the result.  As has been noted earlier, particulary as they get larger, they ARE predators, very good ones actually.


Paul Willison
Kentwood, Michigan(Lake Michigan watershed).



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