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#1 9darlingcalvi

9darlingcalvi
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  • Moorhead,MN

Posted 22 February 2016 - 08:02 AM

I know not many people even think about putting chara sp. in an aqaurium, but I need to grow chara so my Minnesota sand bottomed lake biotope is accurate. Dose anyone know how to grow this complex algea? Also the tank will have Iowa or Johnny darters and maybe a mudminnow

#2 9darlingcalvi

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  • Moorhead,MN

Posted 22 February 2016 - 08:03 AM

Forgot to add the tank is 10 gallons

#3 gerald

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  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 22 February 2016 - 10:14 AM

I have not grown Chara, but i think its needs are pretty similar to Nitella, which I've grown for years.  Moderate to high GH hardness (at least 4 dGH = 70 mg/L) helps; they dont grow well in very soft water.  Any reasonably bright lighting should be OK - cheap shop lights are fine.  Not sure how important photoperiod is for these macro-algae. 


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#4 Sean Phillips

Sean Phillips
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  • Allegheny River Drainage, Southwest PA

Posted 22 February 2016 - 10:26 AM

I've no idea how to grow it but, it looks to be a very interesting species. Let us know how it goes if you attempt it!
Sean Phillips - Pine Creek Watershed - Allegheny River Drainage

#5 9darlingcalvi

9darlingcalvi
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  • Moorhead,MN

Posted 22 February 2016 - 11:06 AM

Okay, I have an 18" aqueon floresent plant light

#6 centrarchid

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Posted 22 February 2016 - 02:53 PM

High alkalinity to go with hardness.  Keep organics low.  In my ponds it drops out when temperature gets high.


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#7 9darlingcalvi

9darlingcalvi
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Posted 22 February 2016 - 03:20 PM

organics? like leaves? I also have the same light but full spectrum. here is the tank, should I keep the wood? this is the habitat im trying to replicate 

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#8 9darlingcalvi

9darlingcalvi
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  • Moorhead,MN

Posted 22 February 2016 - 03:22 PM

sorry dont have picture of the tank



#9 centrarchid

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Posted 22 February 2016 - 03:22 PM

Dissolved organic compounds like associated with over feeding.  If all goes well you should see marl deposition although that will require a lot of light without cooking the Chara.


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#10 9darlingcalvi

9darlingcalvi
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Posted 22 February 2016 - 03:24 PM

oh, do they have to have mineral deposits? would the light I have work



#11 centrarchid

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Posted 22 February 2016 - 03:41 PM

When water is hard and photosynthesis is going full bore you often see carbonates buildup.  I am not an expert on lighting.


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#12 9darlingcalvi

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Posted 22 February 2016 - 03:44 PM

how many watts per gallon would someone say?



#13 gzeiger

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Posted 22 February 2016 - 09:19 PM

Your light should be fine if it's really a daylight spectrum bulb (generally in the range of 4-7000K rating). A 10 gallon tank is shallow enough.

 

Search the forum - I remember a topic on Chara a few years ago that was likely worth looking at.



#14 9darlingcalvi

9darlingcalvi
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Posted 22 February 2016 - 09:43 PM

So, Iowa ir Johnny darters?

#15 Irate Mormon

Irate Mormon
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Posted 23 February 2016 - 12:00 AM

Personally I would go with Dylan Darters.


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#16 9darlingcalvi

9darlingcalvi
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Posted 23 February 2016 - 07:37 AM

Irate stop!!!!!! Everything isn't a joke! I want serious answers!

#17 9darlingcalvi

9darlingcalvi
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  • Moorhead,MN

Posted 23 February 2016 - 01:39 PM

Anyone have a preference? Besides Irate!

#18 gerald

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  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 23 February 2016 - 05:37 PM

It's up to you; they're both very nice fish.  Iowas have a more color, but Johnnys are easy to get and easy to keep.

Chara (and other hard-water plants) don't NEED mineral deposits.  The CaCO3 precipitate is just a side effect of the plants removing CO2 and HCO3 ions from the water.  So really it's more like a "waste product" of the plants.


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#19 9darlingcalvi

9darlingcalvi
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  • Moorhead,MN

Posted 23 February 2016 - 06:27 PM

okay, I think johnny darters would be my preference as I can find them easily. I was thinking 3 bunches of coontails scattered. whats the best way to plants them? wrap and tie a couple stems to a stone and then bury the stone?



#20 gzeiger

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 08:58 PM

Depends what species you're calling coontail. Ceratophyllum demersum is best left floating. You can anchor it any way you like to keep it in place, but buried portions will typically rot off.






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