Jump to content


Photo

NC Aquarium brown trout


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Phry

Phry
  • NANFA Guest
  • North Carolina

Posted 07 August 2016 - 10:39 PM

Ok I'm pretty sure this one is a brown trout, right? NC Aquarium at Fort Fisher.

Attached Files



#2 Matt DeLaVega

Matt DeLaVega
  • Forum Staff
  • Ohio

Posted 07 August 2016 - 11:03 PM

Nope brook. Which is actually a char. Char have light spots on a dark background, trouts have dark spots on a light background when present.


The member formerly known as Skipjack


#3 UncleWillie

UncleWillie
  • NANFA Member

Posted 08 August 2016 - 07:40 AM

Also, here's a giveaway...  Brook trout is the only trout (in the Eastern U.S.) to have that nice white on the leading marginal edge on the ventral fins.  Those white edges on the pectoral, pelvic and anal fins should be an indicator.


Willie P
Roswell, GA


#4 Matt DeLaVega

Matt DeLaVega
  • Forum Staff
  • Ohio

Posted 08 August 2016 - 08:04 AM

Also, here's a giveaway...  Brook trout is the only trout (in the Eastern U.S.) to have that nice white on the leading marginal edge on the ventral fins.  Those white edges on the pectoral, pelvic and anal fins should be an indicator.

I agree mostly, however I have seen this in browns as well, though not consistently.Attached File  Brown trout.jpg   151.66KB   0 downloads


The member formerly known as Skipjack


#5 UncleWillie

UncleWillie
  • NANFA Member

Posted 08 August 2016 - 08:26 AM

Ah yes.  That's a great photo showing those white fins.  I have yet to see white on browns' pectoral fins, but again, maybe not the best indicator.

Now I must go out and catch one of these things on a fly...


Willie P
Roswell, GA


#6 Phry

Phry
  • NANFA Guest
  • North Carolina

Posted 08 August 2016 - 11:18 AM

Also, here's a giveaway...  Brook trout is the only trout (in the Eastern U.S.) to have that nice white on the leading marginal edge on the ventral fins.  Those white edges on the pectoral, pelvic and anal fins should be an indicator.

You mean these white edges?

 

So if I understand, Brook trout have these lovely white borders, and have light on dark spots, and the other trout have dark on light spots. And if I remember, the brook trout is the only one that is actually native to our waters (in the eastern US)?

Attached Files



#7 UncleWillie

UncleWillie
  • NANFA Member

Posted 08 August 2016 - 11:47 AM

Right.  So at Matt DLV mentioned, Browns can have white margins, too.  But I have yet to see a brown with white margins along all 3 of the ventral fins (the anal, pelvic, AND pectoral).  Also, I look to the patterns along the dorsum.  Brookies tend to have a more squiggly patterns along their backs, that eventually turn into spots once they reach the sides.


Willie P
Roswell, GA


#8 Matt DeLaVega

Matt DeLaVega
  • Forum Staff
  • Ohio

Posted 08 August 2016 - 12:29 PM

I have not caught nor seen any browns with the white edge on the pectorals either. Brook trout almost always have the white leading edge unless they are raceway fish whose fins have the leading edge worn to nubs as shown in the anal fin in the first photo of the thread.

 

 Yes, they are the only char native to the Appalachians and a few other eastern areas, as well as an anadromous population in the northeast.

 

 Browns are not native to the continent at all.


The member formerly known as Skipjack


#9 Phry

Phry
  • NANFA Guest
  • North Carolina

Posted 08 August 2016 - 12:49 PM

I have not caught nor seen any browns with the white edge on the pectorals either. Brook trout almost always have the white leading edge unless they are raceway fish whose fins have the leading edge worn to nubs as shown in the anal fin in the first photo of the thread.

 

 Yes, they are the only char native to the Appalachians and a few other eastern areas, as well as an anadromous population in the northeast.

 

 Browns are not native to the continent at all.

Raceway fish?

 

Also, could you elaborate a little on trout vs. char?  I looked it up but I'm not sure I'm clear.  It sounds like both are members of the Salmoninae subfamily, but trout are from the genera Onchorynchus and Salmo, whereas char are members of the genus Salvelinus; but some sites also called members of Salvelinus trout, so I'm confused. 

(I do realize common names were originally given on a descriptive and not taxonomic basis, and that taxonomist sometimes 'hijack' the common names to exclude some of the animals that still commonly go by that name; eg, the American robin isn't actually a robin but a thrush.)



#10 Matt DeLaVega

Matt DeLaVega
  • Forum Staff
  • Ohio

Posted 08 August 2016 - 02:07 PM

People refer to brook and bull trout as trout, they are really char. I cannot speak to the differences well. So really the genus determines it. I would have to Google it, but you can do that as well as I.

 

Raceway is a hatchery term. it refers to the long concrete troughs where fingerlings are raised to a stocking size. They are stocked at high densities as they are almost always flow through systems.Pull water off of a large spring, cold stream or river and return the water to the same waterway. The concrete and high stocking densities are causes of poor finnage.


The member formerly known as Skipjack





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users