Jump to content


Photo

Creek Chubsucker vs. Bridle Shiner


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 FishyJackson

FishyJackson
  • NANFA Member
  • Long Island

Posted 10 September 2016 - 09:45 PM

Caught a bunch of these today in the Peconic.  Was convinced they were all juvenile Eastern Creek Chubsuckers but I've managed to confuse myself.  The last 2 pics look more like a Bridle Shiner to me now.  Can someone confirm that the first 3 pics are juvenile Creek Chubs, and then if the last 2 pics are of Creek Chub as well?

 

Attached File  Screenshot_20160910-185732.png   884.56KB   1 downloads

 

Attached File  20160910_111131.jpg   66.59KB   1 downloads

 

Attached File  20160910_095921.jpg   59.87KB   1 downloads

 

Attached File  20160910_202653.jpg   95.07KB   1 downloads

 

Attached File  20160910_202740.jpg   48.5KB   1 downloads



#2 Mike

Mike
  • Regional Rep
  • Indiana

Posted 10 September 2016 - 10:11 PM

Mouth looks wrong, so it is not a Eastern Creek Chubsucker.


Mike Berg
Northwest Indiana

#3 FishyJackson

FishyJackson
  • NANFA Member
  • Long Island

Posted 11 September 2016 - 10:34 AM

interesting.. their mouths seemed to jut out a little bit, seemed suckerish.  

 

Attached File  Screenshot_20160911-112337.png   1.08MB   1 downloads

 

 

looking at this that I found on internet, possibly another couple identifying features?  Scale size seems bigger on my fish, and also the dark band on my fish, where it ends at the tail, it stays same size or maybe even gets smaller, while on the juvenile chubsucker below the dark band expands at the tail where it ends and gets wider.  

 

 

 

Attached File  AdultMale top juvenile bott creek chubsucker.png   1.38MB   1 downloads



#4 gerald

gerald
  • Global Moderator
  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 11 September 2016 - 10:57 AM

They are definitely Notropis shiners of some kind - NOT creek chubs (Semotilus) or creek chubsuckers (Erimyzon).

Look at the dorsal fin shape, # of rays, and position of anal fin (would be farther back on a sucker).

I dont know which other Notropis are in that area, but bridle shiner looks like a good guess.


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#5 FishyJackson

FishyJackson
  • NANFA Member
  • Long Island

Posted 11 September 2016 - 11:31 AM

Mike/Gerald thanks, bridle shiner it is .  The enthusiasm is unbridled 



#6 Dustin

Dustin
  • Forum Staff

Posted 12 September 2016 - 08:02 AM

Any time you catch a bridle shiner, it's a good find.  I agree with Gerald.  It's definitely not a chub or sucker and bridle shiner looks right if it's in the area.


Dustin Smith
At the convergence of the Broad, Saluda and Congaree
Lexington, SC


#7 FirstChAoS

FirstChAoS
  • Regional Rep

Posted 12 September 2016 - 12:53 PM

Aren't Bridel Shiners protected? Or is that just up here.

#8 Dustin

Dustin
  • Forum Staff

Posted 12 September 2016 - 12:54 PM

They are down here too.  


Dustin Smith
At the convergence of the Broad, Saluda and Congaree
Lexington, SC


#9 FishyJackson

FishyJackson
  • NANFA Member
  • Long Island

Posted 13 September 2016 - 10:38 AM

Any time you catch a bridle shiner, it's a good find.  I agree with Gerald.  It's definitely not a chub or sucker and bridle shiner looks right if it's in the area.

 

Didn't realize the Bridles are relatively rare, they seemed to be in good numbers in that one spot at least.  These Eastern Creek Chubsuckers will be a damn good find if they are ever found, they seem quite elusive 



#10 fritz

fritz
  • Board of Directors

Posted 13 September 2016 - 12:26 PM

They are pretty widespread in NY.  Check out distribution in the new NY book



#11 FishyJackson

FishyJackson
  • NANFA Member
  • Long Island

Posted 13 September 2016 - 01:11 PM

They are pretty widespread in NY.  Check out distribution in the new NY book

 

Hey Fritz I shouldve been more specific, I meant find them on Long Island.  They're only in the Peconic River system.  There's a few rare fish in the Peconic like Banded Sunfish and Swamp Darter, but I'm thinking maybe all these fish are in the very upper portion of the river which I don't think I can access.  



#12 gerald

gerald
  • Global Moderator
  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 15 September 2016 - 03:50 PM

An easy way to ID baby chubsuckers (without even lifting them out of the net) is the pattern on top of the head: Look for a mid-dorsal LIGHT stripe bordered by a darker stripe on each side.  This works on chubsuckers that are small enough to confuse with shiners.  They lose it as they get bigger.


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users