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What Darter is this?


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#1 taldridge0321

taldridge0321
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  • Catawba Watershed, Waxhaw, North Carolina

Posted 26 December 2016 - 02:57 PM

Lippard Creek, Lincolnton, NC

I have never caught one out of this place quite like this. I usually catch Seagreen, Fantail, Piedmont and Tessies here, but what is this one?December+_489_.JPG



#2 taldridge0321

taldridge0321
  • NANFA Member
  • Catawba Watershed, Waxhaw, North Carolina

Posted 26 December 2016 - 03:17 PM

Merry Christmas to everyone by the way. Lippard+_1_.JPG



#3 taldridge0321

taldridge0321
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  • Catawba Watershed, Waxhaw, North Carolina

Posted 26 December 2016 - 03:18 PM

I am leaning towards V-Lip or Notchlip Redhorse, the lips don't look like a Brassy Jumprock or White Sucker.Lippard+_2_.JPG



#4 taldridge0321

taldridge0321
  • NANFA Member
  • Catawba Watershed, Waxhaw, North Carolina

Posted 26 December 2016 - 03:19 PM

Lippard+_3_.JPG



#5 taldridge0321

taldridge0321
  • NANFA Member
  • Catawba Watershed, Waxhaw, North Carolina

Posted 26 December 2016 - 03:19 PM

Lippard+_4_.JPG



#6 taldridge0321

taldridge0321
  • NANFA Member
  • Catawba Watershed, Waxhaw, North Carolina

Posted 26 December 2016 - 03:20 PM

I caught tons of Seagreen Darters, and I thought I had caught all of the Darters in my area previously?Lippard+_5_.JPG



#7 taldridge0321

taldridge0321
  • NANFA Member
  • Catawba Watershed, Waxhaw, North Carolina

Posted 26 December 2016 - 03:20 PM

Another view of the sucker.Lippard+_6_.JPG



#8 taldridge0321

taldridge0321
  • NANFA Member
  • Catawba Watershed, Waxhaw, North Carolina

Posted 26 December 2016 - 03:21 PM

Lippard+_7_.JPG



#9 taldridge0321

taldridge0321
  • NANFA Member
  • Catawba Watershed, Waxhaw, North Carolina

Posted 26 December 2016 - 03:21 PM

Sandbar or Swallowtail I believe.Lippard+_8_.JPG



#10 taldridge0321

taldridge0321
  • NANFA Member
  • Catawba Watershed, Waxhaw, North Carolina

Posted 26 December 2016 - 03:22 PM

Greenfin I think.Lippard+_9_.JPG



#11 taldridge0321

taldridge0321
  • NANFA Member
  • Catawba Watershed, Waxhaw, North Carolina

Posted 26 December 2016 - 03:42 PM

I also found a small group of Speckled Killifish, they are either really brave or don't care because you can walk right up to them and scoop them up.Speckled+Killifish+_8_.JPG



#12 Matt DeLaVega

Matt DeLaVega
  • Board of Directors
  • Ohio

Posted 26 December 2016 - 05:33 PM

It looks like an oddball seagreen to my eye. Is the sucker maybe one of your jumprocks?


The member formerly known as Skipjack


#13 taldridge0321

taldridge0321
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  • Catawba Watershed, Waxhaw, North Carolina

Posted 26 December 2016 - 05:54 PM

It looks like an oddball seagreen to my eye. Is the sucker maybe one of your jumprocks?

It could maybe be a Brassy Jumprock, but it looks very similar to a Notchlip Redhorse I caught a month or so back in the Lynches. 



#14 Matt DeLaVega

Matt DeLaVega
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  • Ohio

Posted 26 December 2016 - 06:53 PM

Very likely, not very schooled in your fish, just struck  me as a jumprock rather than redhorse.


The member formerly known as Skipjack


#15 Michael Wolfe

Michael Wolfe
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  • North Georgia, Oconee River Drainage

Posted 26 December 2016 - 09:57 PM

I dont think your darters look unusual... they actually look like they think it is spring. Now temper this with the fact that I am used to seeing turquoise, so similar but not exactly the same thing.  But is seems to me that the first one is a male coloring up and the second one is his chubby girlfriend. What do you see that looks different yo you?

 

And I call everything that small a jumprock... obviously it could be a juvenile of a different redhorse... but unless you start counting scales or rays or both, I'm not going to know for sure.


Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin

#16 taldridge0321

taldridge0321
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  • Catawba Watershed, Waxhaw, North Carolina

Posted 27 December 2016 - 07:20 AM

 

I dont think your darters look unusual... they actually look like they think it is spring. Now temper this with the fact that I am used to seeing turquoise, so similar but not exactly the same thing.  But is seems to me that the first one is a male coloring up and the second one is his chubby girlfriend. What do you see that looks different yo you?

 

And I call everything that small a jumprock... obviously it could be a juvenile of a different redhorse... but unless you start counting scales or rays or both, I'm not going to know for sure.

 

 

Just the coloring and the green bars. I may have only been catching female Seagreens up until now, the blue colors made me think Turquoise Darter but I know they aren't native to that area. On the Redhorse, I will do a scale count today if I can zoom in on the picture enough.



#17 taldridge0321

taldridge0321
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  • Catawba Watershed, Waxhaw, North Carolina

Posted 27 December 2016 - 07:50 AM

 

Just the coloring and the green bars. I may have only been catching female Seagreens up until now, the blue colors made me think Turquoise Darter but I know they aren't native to that area. On the Redhorse, I will do a scale count today if I can zoom in on the picture enough.

I counted 10 dorsal rays on it, but the scales are tiny and would be hard to count accurately.



#18 Michael Wolfe

Michael Wolfe
  • Board of Directors
  • North Georgia, Oconee River Drainage

Posted 27 December 2016 - 08:28 AM

 

Just the coloring and the green bars. I may have only been catching female Seagreens up until now, the blue colors made me think Turquoise Darter but I know they aren't native to that area. On the Redhorse, I will do a scale count today if I can zoom in on the picture enough.

 

Quote from my Peterson's on Seagreen Darters: "On large male, blue-greenbars pass through blotches on side and encircle body near caudal fin."

 

And for Turquoise Darter; "Nearly identical to Seagreen Darter..." and then say except number of dark saddles on the back and horizontal rows of small red spots on large males.  In fact, they are so similar, that they don't even show a picture for the Turquoise.  But I will throw out a little eye candy for my local darter (no thread jack intended).

0320 outing 33.jpg


Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin

#19 taldridge0321

taldridge0321
  • NANFA Member
  • Catawba Watershed, Waxhaw, North Carolina

Posted 27 December 2016 - 08:37 AM

 

Quote from my Peterson's on Seagreen Darters: "On large male, blue-greenbars pass through blotches on side and encircle body near caudal fin."

 

And for Turquoise Darter; "Nearly identical to Seagreen Darter..." and then say except number of dark saddles on the back and horizontal rows of small red spots on large males.  In fact, they are so similar, that they don't even show a picture for the Turquoise.  But I will throw out a little eye candy for my local darter (no thread jack intended).

attachicon.gif0320 outing 33.jpg

Nice fish. I got into a mess of Turquoise on my Georgia trip, and also at one of Dustin's spots near Pelion, SC.



#20 Michael Wolfe

Michael Wolfe
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  • North Georgia, Oconee River Drainage

Posted 27 December 2016 - 08:37 AM

I counted 10 dorsal rays on it, but the scales are tiny and would be hard to count accurately.

 

I went into the gallery archive and looked at some of those pictures at full size and I think I count 11 dorsal rays... but that could be either brassy jumprock or striped jumprock (and you are in range for either one).  You are gonna have to wait for a better ID guy than me on such a small sucker.


Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin



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