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Odd size 40 gallon aqurium


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#21 truecrimson

truecrimson
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Posted 14 February 2017 - 09:59 AM

 

With spray foam, you can trim it, paint it, carve and shape it, etc. and make it look like you want, including blending it into the background.  You can also use it to cover the holes and make the existing background higher.  It's entirely up to you.  Even if what you do is not a perfect match, eventually algae will grow on it, etc. and it will blend in.  Good luck whatever you decide, I'll be following.  

 

Another option is to simply modify the holes and background a little bit (if it's made of foam) and encourage fish to use it as cover, especially if you're doing a sunfish tank.

 

If you cut and reshape some of it, paint it with regular Drylok mixed with cement colorant (dries and cures quickly) and make it blend into the rest of the background.  Same if you use the spray foam.

 

A nice piece of driftwood might look pretty good in that upper 2".   :)

 

Modify the holes in what way?

 

I have no artistic ability, and no confidence in my ability to shape, cut, color, or blend anything.

 

I do like the idea of a piece of driftwood at the top.  Or roots.

 

To be honest, I am now not sure what the background is made from.  I had assumed foam coated in something, but it may not be.  I'm not sure how to determine that.



#22 truecrimson

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Posted 14 February 2017 - 10:11 AM

I noticed the other night that there is water in the cavity behind the right side ledge.

 

Attached File  02142017RearOfLedgeB.jpg   209.72KB   0 downloads

 

I couldn't see any holes but I tuned off all the lights and shone a flashlight into the back of it and there they are

 

Attached File  02142017FrontOfLedgeDarkLightThroughHoles.jpg   67.43KB   0 downloads

 

Is that OK, or do you think will cause problems?



#23 littlen

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Posted 14 February 2017 - 11:04 AM

There is always a chance that some pathogen is being harbored in it, but think the chance is small and the risk is low.  Besides, when you fill it with new tank water, it wants to seep IN to the void, not escape.  So you should be okay.


Nick L.

#24 truecrimson

truecrimson
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Posted 14 February 2017 - 02:14 PM

There is always a chance that some pathogen is being harbored in it, but think the chance is small and the risk is low.  Besides, when you fill it with new tank water, it wants to seep IN to the void, not escape.  So you should be okay.

 

Cool.  Then I won't worry about it.

 

I tried to take a rear view picture, but it was getting horrible glare.  I ended up using the flash which created glare at the top but most of the rear of the background is more visible.

 

Attached File  02142017RearView.jpg   193.45KB   0 downloads

 

How bad is it if fish do get back there?

 



#25 Chasmodes

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Posted 14 February 2017 - 04:45 PM

 

Modify the holes in what way?

 

I have no artistic ability, and no confidence in my ability to shape, cut, color, or blend anything.

 

I do like the idea of a piece of driftwood at the top.  Or roots.

 

To be honest, I am now not sure what the background is made from.  I had assumed foam coated in something, but it may not be.  I'm not sure how to determine that.

 

I was thinking that you could round them off and make them look more natural.  You could also put driftwood through them to hide the holes if you wanted to.  It's a nice looking background.

 

As far as fish getting back there, as long as they can get out on their own to feed, no problem.  You just don't want them to get back there, can't get out, and die, that would be bad.  But if they can move freely about, not a problem at all.  The only downside to that is that you might not get to see them if they're shy.  That said, food has a tendency to counter that.  Once your fish realize that you are the food source, they'll come out to eat.


Kevin Wilson


#26 JasonL

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Posted 14 February 2017 - 09:45 PM

Couple of more thoughts:

1. If at all possible I would try to get some submersible plants growing behind that background in some gravel for reasons already mentioned. Not sure how much light is getting back there with the current hood though by looking at your pics so this may or may not be feasible.
2. You can easily make a wire mesh in the front holes to secure a plant. Then have the roots grow behind the backgound and have the plant spread out in front.
3. Alternatively you could put a couple large air stones behind there and then PVC pipe the bubbles through those two openings for a cool effect.
4. If you have enough light you can grow water hyacinth (non native floating plant) along the back edge panel and the roots will cover the top edge of your background and prevent jumpers. Ample light is the key here- hyacinth will wither away with just ambient room light. I have this identical setup in my indoor 110 gallon tank when I overwinter the hyacinth from my outdoor patio pond. (FYI Do NOT release hyacinth as it is highly invasive in southern climates.)

Just a couple more ideas to mull over. Be sure to post pics of the finished product.

#27 truecrimson

truecrimson
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Posted 26 February 2017 - 03:36 PM

Minor update.  Got some furniture moved, one overloaded bookshelf destroyed, and the tanks in place.

Attached File  20170226BothTanksInPlace.jpg   182.81KB   0 downloads

 

I had wanted to put mine on the end and my wife's in the middle of the wall.  However the need to access the electrical, phone, and other outlets overruled and mine ended up in the middle of the wall.  If it had been on the end then I could see behind the background from my "office" at the kitchen table.  

 

We may still do some rearranging.

 

Her stand was fairly unstable on the carpet and mine was a little.  So I decided to get 2 more pieces of plywood to go under them.  that helped with stability immensely.  I'm not sure if we will get either filled today.  I don't have a filter yet and I'm sure she is going to want some minor adjustments.



#28 truecrimson

truecrimson
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Posted 05 August 2017 - 08:32 AM

Hey guys, 

Sorry I have not been around much.  My new job and the schedule change have eaten all of my time and energy.

 

I got my aquarium set up and running some time ago.  Used top soil capped with substrate from a local stream and a couple of large rocks I found.   It developed a nice assortment of snails and what looked to my uneducted eye like planaria or some other flatworm, along with some other macro invertebrates.

 

Last Sunday I added the first fish, a Redbreast Sunfish, about 3 or 4 inches long.  It has adapted well so far.  Within a day or two it began to watch us move around the room, and it recognizes that I bring food.  It readily eats meal worms, but had some trouble with earthworms.  We tried to feed it some shrimp from the grocery store last night, and it did take it but spit it out.

 

It is able to pass to and from the back of the tank behind the background with no problem, even turning on it's side to scoot through the two rectangular openings up top.  I imagine that it will eventually outgrow the openings.

 

I will try to post pictures when I get time.

 

Is there a way to sex sunfish, other than waiting for them to build a nest or not?  Do you think I have enough capacity for any other fish in the 40 gallon?  If so, what species are likely to survive the sunfish and be good tank mates?

 

I've named it Morsel, because it isn't big enough for a sandwich yet ;)

 

Thanks for all of your help and inspiration.






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