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Collection Gear question


27 replies to this topic

#1 Warhawk

Warhawk
  • NANFA Guest
  • Fort Wayne IN

Posted 08 March 2017 - 04:31 PM

So I have yet to go collecting but looking at gear. I know there is a lot of different types of collecting and gear that is needed for each so wanted to ask it all at one time.

 

Micro Fishing

Hooks,-  size 20-30 range. I'm going to check the local fly fishing store for those.

Pole,- will a cane pole work? Or even a normal fishing pole?

Line- Again going to look at fly fishing line the smallest I can get

 

Net

Will this work? https://www.walmart....ng-Net/19717448

 

Minnow Trap

I have seen some store bought traps https://www.walmart....x-16.5/38423168

Or even some DIY out of soda bottles

 

Would one of those work?

 

 



#2 taldridge0321

taldridge0321
  • NANFA Member
  • Catawba Watershed, Waxhaw, North Carolina

Posted 08 March 2017 - 04:41 PM

I can only speak for the dip nets, just from my experience, spend a little more and get a good quality dip net. I'm sure the other guys can tell you which ones are good, but anything from Wal Mart is not going to stand up for even the average collector, ie for moving rocks, leaf litter, etc.



#3 Warhawk

Warhawk
  • NANFA Guest
  • Fort Wayne IN

Posted 08 March 2017 - 04:47 PM

I can understand that if I can get a idea of what to look for it will help know what to stay away from. The folding idea while it sounds cool it just something else that will break given time. I did stop at a fishing shop at lunch but they didn't have anything I could use so started looking online.  I hope one of the other stores in town has something that will work.


Edited by Warhawk, 08 March 2017 - 04:47 PM.


#4 JasonL

JasonL
  • NANFA Member
  • Kentucky

Posted 08 March 2017 - 04:49 PM

Minnow traps are hit and miss. You will get way more yield from a dipnet or a seine in my experience and they are more fun to use anyhow with instant results.

In terms of dip nets, I went through 3 or 4 of these in one summer before I wised up and ordered the perfect dipnet from Jonahs aquarium via Amazon or their website directly.. It costs a more initially but lasts for years and will save you both money and angst in the long run.

Buy this and thank me later.

#5 Warhawk

Warhawk
  • NANFA Guest
  • Fort Wayne IN

Posted 08 March 2017 - 04:57 PM

Minnow traps are hit and miss. You will get way more yield from a dipnet or a seine in my experience and they are more fun to use anyhow with instant results.

In terms of dip nets, I went through 3 or 4 of these in one summer before I wised up and ordered the perfect dipnet from Jonahs aquarium via Amazon or their website directly.. It costs a more initially but lasts for years and will save you both money and angst in the long run.

Buy this and thank me later.

That isn't a bad idea those nets do look nice. And I can't collect until it warms up anyway(well I can but it's too cold for me)

 

Thanks



#6 taldridge0321

taldridge0321
  • NANFA Member
  • Catawba Watershed, Waxhaw, North Carolina

Posted 08 March 2017 - 05:01 PM

Jason is right, I bought one and haven't looked back.



#7 Matt DeLaVega

Matt DeLaVega
  • Board of Directors
  • Ohio

Posted 08 March 2017 - 05:28 PM

Ebay. Search Tenkara rod. You can find some inexpensive collapsible rods that would do fine for microfishing. I think you can get away with almost anything really. Ben Cantrell is the guy to message here about microfishing. He may steer you differently, but for the limited amount that I do a $20 dollar collapsible tenkara rod is pretty handy. I always use flies, but it seems most people use tiny pieces of red worms or other live bait. Flies are easy, they last, and don't stink up your vehicle if you forget them, but may not be as effective, or small enough for some species. If you can catch Ben, I am sure he will steer you right.

 

Perfect dipnet. Can't go wrong.

 

Minnow traps, I agree with others. Unless you have a stream within walking distance, and want feeder fish for a predatory fish, I can't see much use in them. Crayfish for the table is the only reason I have ever used them.

 

Good luck!


The member formerly known as Skipjack


#8 Josh Blaylock

Josh Blaylock
  • Board of Directors
  • Central Kentucky

Posted 08 March 2017 - 05:34 PM

I used to use my Perfect Dipnet all the time, pretty much all I used.  Over time, I found that using a 4x4 Seine, solo, is very easily managed and now I rarely use my Perfect Dipnet.  These days, I use a 4x4 or 4x6 seine mostly.  I get the soft green seine from Douglas Net Company, and attached 2 broom handles from Lowes.  If you want to seine, don't waist time with Frabill stuff from walmart.


Josh Blaylock - Central KY
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#9 don212

don212
  • NANFA Member

Posted 08 March 2017 - 06:45 PM

So I have yet to go collecting but looking at gear. I know there is a lot of different types of collecting and gear that is needed for each so wanted to ask it all at one time.

 

Micro Fishing

Hooks,-  size 20-30 range. I'm going to check the local fly fishing store for those.

Pole,- will a cane pole work? Or even a normal fishing pole?

Line- Again going to look at fly fishing line the smallest I can get

 

Net

Will this work? https://www.walmart....ng-Net/19717448

 

Minnow Trap

I have seen some store bought traps https://www.walmart....x-16.5/38423168

Or even some DIY out of soda bottles

 

Would one of those work?

 

 

i would never buy that folding net, there is one with a simple wooden handle, but a jonahs perfect dipnet is the way to go.minnows are fast and hard to dipnet, so a trap with a small opening would help but is hit and miss, a seine is best for minnows, but i have one of those cheap plastic ones and it is pretty much useless



#10 lilyea

lilyea
  • NANFA Member
  • Peace River Watershed, Central Florida, USA

Posted 08 March 2017 - 07:09 PM

I agree with the other comments about the benefits of the Perfect Dipnet from Jonah's Aquarium.  This is my go-to collecting tool.  Most other dipnets are a one season (or less) use - my Perfect Dipnet has lasted a long time and is still going strong.

 

For microfishing rod and gear, check out the info in the NANFA forum section for "microfishing". I have been pleased with the gear and support that I have received from TenkaraBum.

 

...I found that using a 4x4 Seine, solo, is very easily managed and now I rarely use my Perfect Dipnet.  These days, I use a 4x4 or 4x6 seine mostly.  I get the soft green seine from Douglas Net Company, and attached 2 broom handles from Lowes....

 

 

A 4x4 solo seine can be a great option (depending on the collecting location), but remember that your safety risk increases when you enter the water so be extra careful if you are seining alone.

 

Of course, one of the biggest risks is that collecting fishes can be very addictive!!!

 

Good luck!



#11 olaf

olaf
  • NANFA Member

Posted 08 March 2017 - 07:22 PM

These days, I use a 4x4 or 4x6 seine mostly.  I get the soft green seine from Douglas Net Company

I'm not seeing any green seines on their site. What am I missing? Also, what size mesh do you prefer?

I've been meaning to get a seine (or maybe one long one for two person use and one shorter one for solo expeditions) and my birthday's coming up, with people asking what I want.


Redhorse ID downloads and more: http://moxostoma.com

#12 Josh Blaylock

Josh Blaylock
  • Board of Directors
  • Central Kentucky

Posted 08 March 2017 - 07:49 PM

I'm not seeing any green seines on their site. What am I missing? Also, what size mesh do you prefer?
I've been meaning to get a seine (or maybe one long one for two person use and one shorter one for solo expeditions) and my birthday's coming up, with people asking what I want.

https://www.douglasn...57&cat=6&page=1

I use these, you put the green option in the comments of the order page.

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

Josh Blaylock - Central KY
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KYCREEKS - KRWW - KWA



I hope to have God on my side, but I must have Kentucky.

- Abraham Lincoln, 1861


#13 MtFallsTodd

MtFallsTodd
  • NANFA Member
  • Mountain Falls, Virginia

Posted 08 March 2017 - 08:34 PM

Perfect dipnet, 4x4 seine, several aquarium nets, and a black bucket. I keep this "tool kit" in the trunk of my car at all times. I just use my trout ultralight rig or a hand line for microfishing.
Deep in the hills of Great North Mountain

#14 Matt DeLaVega

Matt DeLaVega
  • Board of Directors
  • Ohio

Posted 08 March 2017 - 09:54 PM

All good info. Best info yet is to not buy a cheap seine like Frabil. Way too stiff, wont lay on bottom, most fish will pass right under. Don't make our mistakes.


The member formerly known as Skipjack


#15 Matt DeLaVega

Matt DeLaVega
  • Board of Directors
  • Ohio

Posted 08 March 2017 - 10:03 PM

Todd mentioned black bucket. Not an accident to say black or at least dark. This is important if you want to take photos. Great advice. A white bucket will cause fish to wash out and look pale. A dark bucket will allow them to retain near natural color, sometimes better.


The member formerly known as Skipjack


#16 mattknepley

mattknepley
  • NANFA Member
  • Smack-dab between the Savannah and the Saluda.

Posted 09 March 2017 - 07:22 AM

Ditto what everybody said about Perfect Dipnet , a Douglas 4x4, and black buckets.  (Even though most of mine are white... :rolleyes: ) 

 

 

Perfect dipnet, 4x4 seine, several aquarium nets, and a black bucket. I keep this "tool kit" in the trunk of my car at all times. I just use my trout ultralight rig or a hand line for microfishing.

 

This pretty much sums it up, especially the "keep it in the car" part.  I might suggest a cooler with a good lid and a baggie of sea salt in the summer, too.


Matt Knepley
"No thanks, a third of a gopher would merely arouse my appetite..."

#17 Warhawk

Warhawk
  • NANFA Guest
  • Fort Wayne IN

Posted 09 March 2017 - 08:11 AM

Wow great info everyone, I will be ordering a net from Jonah for sure. If I find good deal in a trap I might pick one up but I will start with the Dipnet.

 

I have a few white buckets but picking up a few dark color ones is easy. On the seine net I will have to watch a few videos on those today.



#18 gerald

gerald
  • Global Moderator
  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 09 March 2017 - 09:51 AM

You can also paint the inside of a white bucket with black paint; wont overheat as quickly in sun.


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#19 Josh Blaylock

Josh Blaylock
  • Board of Directors
  • Central Kentucky

Posted 09 March 2017 - 02:04 PM

You can also paint the inside of a white bucket with black paint; wont overheat as quickly in sun.

 

Or buy a small cooler, that's what I use nowadays, keeps the water from over heating. 


Josh Blaylock - Central KY
NANFA on Facebook - NANFA on YouTube - NANFA on Google+

KYCREEKS - KRWW - KWA



I hope to have God on my side, but I must have Kentucky.

- Abraham Lincoln, 1861


#20 Doug_Dame

Doug_Dame
  • NANFA Member

Posted 10 March 2017 - 11:41 PM

One of the reasons the cheap "fishing dept" nets don't work well for active collecting is that most of them have the net wrapped around the hoop, as is the case in the one you (OP=Warhawk) pointed to. With this design, the net on the rim is very easily abraded when you drag the net on the bottom for darters. I bought one in an emergency a few years ago, and it literally did not survive one day of collecting. 

 

The Perfect Dipnet (and some others) has a more sophisticated design, where the net is held in a groove in the inner side of the metal hoop, and is thus protected from abrasion.

 

Plus the hoop-to-pole connectors are more robust, the handle is stronger, etc. 

 

Dipnets get a healthy workout during many collecting efforts. Water has a lot of resistance when you're trying to out-speed minnows in a fast strike, and dragging the net through and/or lifting submerged vegetation is also a chore that stresses the gear.

 

The Perfect Dipnet is well regarded here because it's a great balance of functionality, robustness, and price ... which makes it an excellent value.  


Doug Dame

Floridian now in Cincinnati
 




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