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want to purchase cold water Gambusia


10 replies to this topic

#1 and

and
  • NANFA Guest

Posted 30 March 2017 - 07:19 PM

Hi Everybody,

 

We are in the Catskill Mountains of Upstate New York. Gets cold here, and air temperatures can fluctuate 40 degrees within 24hrs.

 

We have been looking on both AquaBid & EBay for some Gambusia that we'd be able to leave outdoors year round, or maybe put inside a cold (40 degree Fahrenheit) basement to winter over.

 

Apparently all of the online retailers are located down South, e.g. Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, etc. Can anybody point us in the right direction, strains kept outdoors in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Great Lakes Region, etc. 

 

Thanks so much!



#2 and

and
  • NANFA Guest

Posted 30 March 2017 - 08:45 PM

or some Macropodus ocellatus. Not a native, but certainly suitable for Northern climates. 



#3 Cu455

Cu455
  • NANFA Member

Posted 31 March 2017 - 06:10 AM

Google pond stocking NY. They will sell Gambusia which were raised in NY. You might find a stocking place that will ship.

#4 gerald

gerald
  • Global Moderator
  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 01 April 2017 - 11:27 AM

I think you will need to bring them indoors in winter or heat the pond to keep it (at least part of it) above 40 F.  Try mudminnows (Umbra) if you want something more cold-tolerant than Gambusia for mosquito control. 


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#5 and

and
  • NANFA Guest

Posted 02 April 2017 - 07:58 AM

Thanks for replies. We googled "pond stocking NY" and came across fatheads but neither Gambusia nor Umbra. Also, neither of those two species seem as if they would thrive in hot, stagnant, oxygen-deficient water as well as Gambusia. We may just go with Gambusia from Georgia and create our own cold-tolerant stock over the next few years. I had once read of it being done, sounded plausible, the strain might still be around somewhere. And seems as if there may be a market for them vs restocking ponds/pools after ice-out every spring. 



#6 JasonL

JasonL
  • NANFA Member
  • Kentucky

Posted 02 April 2017 - 08:17 AM

I was under the impression that gambusia weren't really that more efficient at mosquito control than other native species you might find locally. Think there should be native minnows in upstate NY which could do the same thing without the hassle.

#7 and

and
  • NANFA Guest

Posted 02 April 2017 - 08:59 AM

Yes there are, I'd imagine there in Kentucky as well. But how many of them can survive in a small (~few hundred gallons) body of stagnant water year-round? They all have higher oxygen requirements &/or a narrower temperature range. There's a reason why the common name for Gambusia is Mosquito Fish, they can thrive in bodies of water where normally only mosquito larvae would thrive. 

 

They are actually native not too far from here: 

http://explorer.natu...busia_holbrooki

 

So another 200 miles further north shouldn't be too much of a challenge.



#8 Michael Wolfe

Michael Wolfe
  • Board of Directors
  • North Georgia, Oconee River Drainage

Posted 02 April 2017 - 11:56 AM

I was under the impression that gambusia weren't really that more efficient at mosquito control than other native species you might find locally. Think there should be native minnows in upstate NY which could do the same thing without the hassle.

 

I really want to second this... get a local fish... most all fish eat mosquito larva


Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin

#9 and

and
  • NANFA Guest

Posted 02 April 2017 - 12:07 PM

yeah leavin now with the minnow traps, update in a day or two hopefully with pics for i.d.'ing 



#10 keepnatives

keepnatives
  • Regional Rep

Posted 02 April 2017 - 03:09 PM

Umbra, mud minnows are quite hardy and could probably handle those conditions as well as or better then gambusia.  But where are you planning on stocking these fish?  Random stocking even of native NY fish can be a bad idea even illegal.


Mike Lucas
Mohawk-Hudson Watershed
Schenectady NY

#11 and

and
  • NANFA Guest

Posted 02 April 2017 - 03:26 PM

yes I know, and well aware that DEC officials lurk forums like this (on the taxpayers's dime) which is why there won'e be any stocking of any fish. End of thread. Good bye. 





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