Jump to content


Photo

Upstate SC


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 sbtgrfan

sbtgrfan
  • NANFA Member
  • Charleston, SC

Posted 15 April 2017 - 11:51 AM

Went on a work collecting trip to the upstate of SC, figured I'd post a few pics of what we caught.

 

Seagreen Darter

Attached File  DSC_0514.JPG   53.51KB   2 downloads

 

Margined Madtom

Attached File  DSC_0559.JPG   48.44KB   1 downloads

Attached File  DSC_0586.JPG   51.47KB   1 downloads

 

Striped Jumprock

Attached File  DSC_0592.JPG   53.4KB   1 downloads

 

Redbreast Sunfish

Attached File  DSC_0607.JPG   66.83KB   2 downloads

 

Fieryblack Shiner

Attached File  DSC_0616.JPG   65.43KB   1 downloads

 

Yellowfin/Greenhead Shiner

Attached File  DSC_0648.JPG   32.32KB   1 downloads

Attached File  DSC_0713.JPG   33.88KB   1 downloads

 

Then a few other views and stuff...

Attached File  DSC_0446.JPG   134.94KB   1 downloads

Attached File  DSC_0447.JPG   35.69KB   1 downloads

Attached File  DSC_0453.JPG   124.64KB   1 downloads

Attached File  DSC_0457.JPG   256.51KB   1 downloads

Attached File  DSC_0463.JPG   283.13KB   1 downloads

Attached File  DSC_0470.JPG   296.09KB   1 downloads

Attached File  DSC_0498.JPG   227.54KB   1 downloads

Attached File  DSC_0499.JPG   332.26KB   1 downloads

 

 

 


Stephen Beaman
Freshwater Aquarist
South Carolina Aquarium
Charleston, SC

#2 sbtgrfan

sbtgrfan
  • NANFA Member
  • Charleston, SC

Posted 15 April 2017 - 11:56 AM

Forgot to include these...ran into a spawning run of Notchlip Redhorse in shallow riffles. Was pretty cool. Managed to net a couple...

 

 

Attached File  IMG_3746.JPG   178.75KB   1 downloads

Attached File  IMG_3747.JPG   160.88KB   1 downloads

Attached File  IMG_3749.JPG   91.31KB   1 downloads

Attached File  IMG_3750.JPG   74.22KB   1 downloads

Attached File  IMG_3753.JPG   243.85KB   1 downloads

 


Stephen Beaman
Freshwater Aquarist
South Carolina Aquarium
Charleston, SC

#3 Michael Wolfe

Michael Wolfe
  • Board of Directors
  • North Georgia, Oconee River Drainage

Posted 15 April 2017 - 04:01 PM

nice darter and very cool notchlips

 

and it seems that tree is winning the battle with that rock, splitting him in half


Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin

#4 MtFallsTodd

MtFallsTodd
  • NANFA Member
  • Mountain Falls, Virginia

Posted 15 April 2017 - 04:58 PM

Really beautiful spot!!
Deep in the hills of Great North Mountain

#5 mattknepley

mattknepley
  • NANFA Member
  • Smack-dab between the Savannah and the Saluda.

Posted 17 April 2017 - 05:48 AM

Nice! Your Fieryblack seems to be a little further along in the color department than the ones I've been finding in the Saluda around Ware Shoals. (Haven't been up there in a couple weeks, though.) Did you collect anything for the SC Aquarium? I'm happy that I appear to have figured out a way to get Fieryblacks home alive. Only collect from late fall to mid-spring, and don't use salt. Also, keep 'em in water as much as possible when handling, and frequently change the water in the storage/photo/transport buckets and tanks to keep the water as fresh and as close to the temp of the water they were collected from as possible. The constant influx of fresh water on site and no salt usage seem to be the biggest factors after time of year.

They seem pretty tough if you get 'em home alive. (Most of my Fieryblack experiences have been just short of silverside-esque in the mortality department till now). Mine spent a few weeks in a totally foreign environment for them, my heavily planted 100g stock tank pond. I feared they'd not do well without current, but they thrived in there till durn string algae kicked in for the season and started goofin' up O2 availability. Moved 5 lucky(?) ones inside to the only tank I have running right now, a 10g that had been designated for 4-5 Carolina Darters. Undersized quarters, but hopefully bigger ones are in the offing soon.
Matt Knepley
"No thanks, a third of a gopher would merely arouse my appetite..."

#6 sbtgrfan

sbtgrfan
  • NANFA Member
  • Charleston, SC

Posted 17 April 2017 - 06:30 AM

Matt,

 

This was a work trip. These were all collected for the aquarium (minus the redhorse, hawk and tree.) 

As far as transporting fieryblacks or any of those cleaner water fish, water changes are crucial. While we don't salt in the transport coolers, we do salt immediately when they arrive at the aquarium. So it's interesting that you've had issues with them and think salt may be a cause. How much were you using? 


Stephen Beaman
Freshwater Aquarist
South Carolina Aquarium
Charleston, SC

#7 gerald

gerald
  • Global Moderator
  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 17 April 2017 - 09:22 AM

It might just be that after salting a bucket, you're less prone to keep changing water frequently.  I'd be surprised if salt at a reasonably low dose (1 to 2 g/L) has any ill effect on fieryblacks.  Salt does help with mitigating that initial stress-induced ion loss that weakens many fishes during collecting and transport, especially when collecting in soft, low-conductivity water.  Much of the ion-loss occurs within the first few minutes after the initial flood of epinephribe (adrenaline).


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#8 Dustin

Dustin
  • Forum Staff

Posted 17 April 2017 - 10:30 AM

I use salt when I collect them and have better success with than without.  The salt, in my experience, is not as crucial in the piedmont and mountain streams, though, where the pH and hardness are reasonable than it is in the tannin-stained waters of the Pee Dee swamps and coastal steams.


Dustin Smith
At the convergence of the Broad, Saluda and Congaree
Lexington, SC


#9 mattknepley

mattknepley
  • NANFA Member
  • Smack-dab between the Savannah and the Saluda.

Posted 17 April 2017 - 04:47 PM

It's entirely possible that I was over-salting their water; I wasn't measuring precisely but I am very sure it would be over one or two grams per liter by a good bit. What is the recommended ratio, again? I've probably been a little cavalier in my salting attitude, but can say I've not used the same amount each time.

Stephen, I still wanna come down and see your stuff at the aquarium. Those redhorse are pretty sharp looking fish, too...
Matt Knepley
"No thanks, a third of a gopher would merely arouse my appetite..."

#10 gerald

gerald
  • Global Moderator
  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 17 April 2017 - 08:08 PM

1 teasp per gal, (1 Tbsp per 3 gal) is roughly 1.5 ppt (g/L).

BTW was this site in the Savannah or Santee drainage? 

That seagreen darter (#1) is lookin' a bit turquoise-ish,


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#11 mattknepley

mattknepley
  • NANFA Member
  • Smack-dab between the Savannah and the Saluda.

Posted 18 April 2017 - 05:20 AM

Thanks, Gerald. Will have to be a little more deliberate in salt use to see if/how it affects fish. I have used it with several other fishes with success. For some reason Fieryblacks have given me trouble til recently.
Matt Knepley
"No thanks, a third of a gopher would merely arouse my appetite..."

#12 gerald

gerald
  • Global Moderator
  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 18 April 2017 - 09:30 AM

Do you hold them in your hand for 5 min, mesmerized and drooling, before dropping them in the bucket?


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#13 sbtgrfan

sbtgrfan
  • NANFA Member
  • Charleston, SC

Posted 18 April 2017 - 01:36 PM

1 teasp per gal, (1 Tbsp per 3 gal) is roughly 1.5 ppt (g/L).

BTW was this site in the Savannah or Santee drainage? 

That seagreen darter (#1) is lookin' a bit turquoise-ish,

 

Santee...From a stream that drains into the South Saluda. Definitely a seagreen, though I agree, very turquoise-ish. 


Stephen Beaman
Freshwater Aquarist
South Carolina Aquarium
Charleston, SC

#14 mattknepley

mattknepley
  • NANFA Member
  • Smack-dab between the Savannah and the Saluda.

Posted 19 April 2017 - 05:31 AM

Those Seagreens that develop stripes do make you double-check the gazetteer to verify which drainage you're in.
Matt Knepley
"No thanks, a third of a gopher would merely arouse my appetite..."

#15 sbtgrfan

sbtgrfan
  • NANFA Member
  • Charleston, SC

Posted 19 April 2017 - 06:21 AM

I've always found seagreens to have the stripes and turquoise more to have blotches that can also develop into stripes at times. Is that just me?


Stephen Beaman
Freshwater Aquarist
South Carolina Aquarium
Charleston, SC

#16 Michael Wolfe

Michael Wolfe
  • Board of Directors
  • North Georgia, Oconee River Drainage

Posted 19 April 2017 - 06:42 AM

I don't really agree. My favorite turquoise picture is all stripes and no saddles left. I feel like you really have to go more by fins if anything. But usually you can't tell without a map!
Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users