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fungus on creek chub?


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#1 Leo1234

Leo1234
  • NANFA Member
  • san clemente, california

Posted 08 May 2017 - 06:06 PM

ill creek chub.jpg

My creek chub just developed this 2 days ago. Is it fungus? I am in the process of moving around the aquarium plants, rocks, etc. Do you think it is stress from the change or something else?

Also, is there a recommended way to raise my PH? It is at about 6.5 and Im trying to keep it at around 7.



#2 littlen

littlen
  • NANFA Member
  • Washington, D.C.

Posted 08 May 2017 - 08:03 PM

The lesion behind the dorsal does not look good at all. The fish looks good--speaking of its body condition but it could be a result of poor water conditions. Certainly that is just speculation. Big, frequent water changes and some salt could clear that right up. The plants may not enjoy the salt however. Hope it recovers.
Nick L.

#3 Josh Blaylock

Josh Blaylock
  • Board of Directors
  • Central Kentucky

Posted 09 May 2017 - 11:24 AM

It's dead, body rot will never end well


Josh Blaylock - Central KY
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#4 Dustin

Dustin
  • Forum Staff

Posted 09 May 2017 - 11:50 AM

The pH will not go up until you improve the water quality.  You may also need to increase the hardness by adding some crushed coral to your filter.


Dustin Smith
At the convergence of the Broad, Saluda and Congaree
Lexington, SC


#5 sbtgrfan

sbtgrfan
  • NANFA Member
  • Charleston, SC

Posted 09 May 2017 - 08:15 PM

Unfortunately, Josh is probably right. Unlikely to survive once it gets like that. Best bet is to fix the cause so it doesn't happen again. Water quality is going to be your culprit. Make sure there's no waste or leftover food. Clean the substrate as best you can. Also add 3-5 ppt salt.
Stephen Beaman
Freshwater Aquarist
South Carolina Aquarium
Charleston, SC

#6 Leo1234

Leo1234
  • NANFA Member
  • san clemente, california

Posted 10 May 2017 - 09:50 AM

How often should I do water changes to increase quality? Should I do the standard once a week water change? One of the reasons I was moving the rocks and stuff is because there were so many rocks, I could not clean the gravel. Should I still add salt if I have 2 amazon swords? will that harm them? 



#7 littlen

littlen
  • NANFA Member
  • Washington, D.C.

Posted 10 May 2017 - 11:21 AM

Leo, the short answer is, as much and as often as it takes.  There is no 'standard' rule on a weekly water change because every tank is different.  If your tank is X-gallons, and you have X-fish, and you feed X-amount...........and still have ammonia or high nitrates in your tank then you need to do a water change.  Or, you need to reduce the bioload on the tank.  That is, reduce the number of fish, or feeding (or both).  

Healthy fish that develop ulcers and lesions, like yours, out of the blue generally means poor water quality.  Especially if nothing has changed or been added recently.  Again, we don't mean to assume, but a lot of us have seen such results in those conditions.

Salt will probably stress your plants.  Just pull them and put them in a bucket with new water for a few weeks while your tank is being salted.


Nick L.

#8 Leo1234

Leo1234
  • NANFA Member
  • san clemente, california

Posted 12 May 2017 - 08:20 PM

I just tested the water and it still seems to be the same. Ammonia is 0, nitrite and nitrate are at 0.  I have done two 50% water changes this week. 

Some of my other fish seem to be developing white scales

 

Could it be something else?



#9 Josh Blaylock

Josh Blaylock
  • Board of Directors
  • Central Kentucky

Posted 12 May 2017 - 08:50 PM

I just tested the water and it still seems to be the same. Ammonia is 0, nitrite and nitrate are at 0.  I have done two 50% water changes this week. 
Some of my other fish seem to be developing white scales
 
Could it be something else?

Typically, when one fish gets it, it spreads to other fish. I know from experience.

My advice, once you see it on a fish, kill it and get it out. Its harsh, but best all around for the system.

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

Josh Blaylock - Central KY
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I hope to have God on my side, but I must have Kentucky.

- Abraham Lincoln, 1861


#10 gerald

gerald
  • Global Moderator
  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 13 May 2017 - 08:22 AM

It's hard to ID a skin infection from a photo, but based on general apearance and location on the body that might be Flexibacter, aka Columnaris, which often attacks after collecting stress or injury.    If your tap water is soft (less than 3 dGH or 50 mg/L hardness) I would add some aragonite (crushed coral) gravel in the filter to raise both the GH hardness and KH alkalinity.


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#11 sbtgrfan

sbtgrfan
  • NANFA Member
  • Charleston, SC

Posted 13 May 2017 - 08:53 AM

Could be a number of things, like gerald said, hard to ID based on photo. 

 

I'd still get that salt up regardless, whether that means you take the plants out or risk it. 5 ppt salt, keep up water changes, clean filters, clean substrate...etc. 


Stephen Beaman
Freshwater Aquarist
South Carolina Aquarium
Charleston, SC



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