Jump to content


Photo

Bachman Run minnows, Lebanon county PA


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 truecrimson

truecrimson
  • NANFA Guest
  • Leb-A-non, PA

Posted 03 June 2017 - 09:04 AM

I'm going to take a stab at this.  I am thinking bluntnose minnows for the first 2 pics and of course more sculpins for last one.

 

Attached File  06022017BluntnoseMinnows.jpg   321.85KB   1 downloads

 

Attached File  06022017BluntnoseMinnow.jpg   229.2KB   1 downloads

 

Attached File  06022017Sculpins.jpg   459.4KB   1 downloads



#2 littlen

littlen
  • NANFA Member
  • Washington, D.C.

Posted 03 June 2017 - 09:11 AM

Blacknose dace


Nick L.

#3 truecrimson

truecrimson
  • NANFA Guest
  • Leb-A-non, PA

Posted 03 June 2017 - 09:39 AM

Awesome, thanks.  I'm looking at pictures now trying to figure out how to tell them apart.



#4 gerald

gerald
  • Global Moderator
  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 03 June 2017 - 10:04 AM

Compare the snout/mouth shape (more snout overhang in Rhinichthys) and size of scales (larger in Pimephales); easy to distinguish once you know what to look for.


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#5 Michael Wolfe

Michael Wolfe
  • Board of Directors
  • North Georgia, Oconee River Drainage

Posted 03 June 2017 - 01:28 PM

Tiny tiny smooth scales = dace

It's a decent rule of thumb almost all the time.
Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin

#6 Matt DeLaVega

Matt DeLaVega
  • Board of Directors
  • Ohio

Posted 03 June 2017 - 06:31 PM

Really different black nose dace. Usually they have a more peppered appearance. Talking about pigment, not blackspot. Not sure I have ever seen them so uniform.


The member formerly known as Skipjack


#7 truecrimson

truecrimson
  • NANFA Guest
  • Leb-A-non, PA

Posted 03 June 2017 - 06:58 PM

Really different black nose dace. Usually they have a more peppered appearance. Talking about pigment, not blackspot. Not sure I have ever seen them so uniform.

 

I'm glad you mentioned that.  That was one of the things that was confusing me in pictures.

 

Tiny tiny smooth scales = dace

It's a decent rule of thumb almost all the time.

 

Cool, thank you.  I'll remember that.



#8 Matt DeLaVega

Matt DeLaVega
  • Board of Directors
  • Ohio

Posted 03 June 2017 - 07:08 PM

They are blacknose dace for sure, but certainly have less pigment than most populations. Funny how much regional or even specific drainage populations can vary. I could see that being confusing with those fish for sure if you weren't pretty familiar with them. Pretty common in smaller streams, so you will likely see them alongside bluntnose minnows and the differences will become clear. A fish in the hand is worth twelve in the book.


The member formerly known as Skipjack


#9 BenCantrell

BenCantrell
  • Moderator
  • San Diego, CA

Posted 03 June 2017 - 09:03 PM

Matt, it's because they're the east coast species / subspecies.

 

Eastern from Virginia.

32936041273_9c79a2b917_c.jpg

 

Western from Tennessee.

32936041193_30fe8e1cb2_c.jpg



#10 Matt DeLaVega

Matt DeLaVega
  • Board of Directors
  • Ohio

Posted 03 June 2017 - 09:15 PM

Duh. Didn't think about that. Pennsylvania seems so close that I didn't even think about it having Atlantic drainages. Thanks Ben.


The member formerly known as Skipjack


#11 MtFallsTodd

MtFallsTodd
  • NANFA Member
  • Mountain Falls, Virginia

Posted 03 June 2017 - 09:31 PM

Yep, looks like the ones in northern virginia
Deep in the hills of Great North Mountain

#12 keepnatives

keepnatives
  • Regional Rep

Posted 03 June 2017 - 11:50 PM

we have both black nose daces in NY the easterns are quite colorful in the spring


Mike Lucas
Mohawk-Hudson Watershed
Schenectady NY

#13 truecrimson

truecrimson
  • NANFA Guest
  • Leb-A-non, PA

Posted 05 June 2017 - 11:15 AM

Matt, it's because they're the east coast species / subspecies.

 

Eastern from Virginia.

32936041273_9c79a2b917_c.jpg

 

Western from Tennessee.

32936041193_30fe8e1cb2_c.jpg

 

Wow.  I would not have thought those were the same type of fish.



#14 BenCantrell

BenCantrell
  • Moderator
  • San Diego, CA

Posted 05 June 2017 - 01:17 PM

Honestly I'm not sure if they're considered the same species now or are still separate (R. atratulus and R. obtusus).






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users