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Water critter Id


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#1 Cricket

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 04:59 PM

Out in bumblebee Arizona at a pond. Anyone know what this thing is?

#2 Cricket

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 05:00 PM

[attachment=18919:0924171454b-1.jpg]

#3 Cricket

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 05:02 PM

I have trouble adding pics from the mobile version. Actually I just don't know how lol. How about the frog type?

#4 Cricket

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 05:07 PM

Would any aquarium fish like to eat these bugs?[attachment=18920:0924171455b-1.jpg][attachment=18921:1506290694054365701554.jpg]

#5 Cricket

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 05:11 PM

Underwater plant

[attachment=18922:0924171507-1.jpg][attachment=18923:0924171509-1.jpg]

Edited by Cricket, 24 September 2017 - 05:13 PM.


#6 Cricket

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 06:47 PM

Those plants are completely submerged tho you can't really tell I think in the picture

#7 gerald

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Posted 24 September 2017 - 08:59 PM

The long insect is a damselfly -- good food for bigger fish.  They can eat tiny fish

The ones with two long rowing legs are backswimmers -- they "sting" with their beak and most fish & frogs won't eat them.

Not sure what kind of tadpole you've got.  Maybe canyon treefrog?  Or spadefoot?  What other frogs/toads are possible in your area?

The plant looks like Nitella or Chara.


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#8 trygon

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 07:23 AM

The plant also looks similar to a species of Naja found in Florida.


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#9 UncleWillie

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 07:27 AM

I second Gerald, but cannot comment on the tadpole.  I agree with Chara as the plant.


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#10 Cricket

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 10:18 AM

The long insect is a damselfly -- good food for bigger fish.  They can eat tiny fish
The ones with two long rowing legs are backswimmers -- they "sting" with their beak and most fish & frogs won't eat them.
Not sure what kind of tadpole you've got.  Maybe canyon treefrog?  Or spadefoot?  What other frogs/toads are possible in your area?
The plant looks like Nitella or Chara.

Judging by the smell I'd say charra. But I think both were present. The frogs in that pond were massive. At least to me lol. This pond is man made fed off a well to water the local ranchers cattle. I've no idea how the frogs got there. Flooding? The frogs I've seen in Prescott and flag were much smaller. The tadpoles there were as fat as a fingertip. The in-between would fit across my palm. (Half frog half tadpole) perhaps a toad? I can look it up :)
Do people ever use this algae in aquariums?

Edited by Cricket, 25 September 2017 - 11:08 AM.


#11 Cricket

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 11:17 AM


The plant also looks similar to a species of Naja found in Florida.


The 2nd species I saw did resemble naja a lot. [attachment=18924:0924171535a-1.jpg][attachment=18925:0924171512a-1.jpg][attachment=18926:0924171512-1.jpg]

#12 Cricket

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 11:37 AM

I guess Arizona isn't always so bad.[attachment=18927:0924171633a-1-1.jpg]
As long as I can remember I've wanted to see North Carolina but at this point I'd take anywhere with natural water :)

I really liked the way this area looked with the tree root shoring up the soil.
[attachment=18928:0924171535a-2-1.jpg]
I'd like to try to mimic this in an aquarium. I brought a dead branch home with me. I think it's a willow? There was a lot of it in the pond. [attachment=18929:0924171604d-1-1-1.jpg]
Forgive my ignorance. We don't see a lot of trees here that aren't either native, olive, citrus or palm. In the Phoenix area.

#13 mattknepley

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 04:32 PM

North Carolina is beautiful in lots of spots, but a lot their water is "backed up", too. (Same for my now-home of SC) I drove across a large portion of Arizona many years ago, much of it blew me away, absolutely gorgeous. All your pics are good, but I really like the landscape. Hillsides covered in Saguaro in late afternoon, winter sun isn't anything I'll forget soon.
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#14 Matt DeLaVega

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 05:22 PM

 winter sun isn't anything I'll forget soon.

No kidding. I could handle a less dreary winter. Ohio has some pretty depressing winters!


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#15 Cricket

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 12:18 AM

North Carolina is beautiful in lots of spots, but a lot their water is "backed up", too. (Same for my now-home of SC) I drove across a large portion of Arizona many years ago, much of it blew me away, absolutely gorgeous. All your pics are good, but I really like the landscape. Hillsides covered in Saguaro in late afternoon, winter sun isn't anything I'll forget soon.

No kidding. I could handle a less dreary winter. Ohio has some pretty depressing winters!


I remember feeling that way 20 years ago. Now I could never see one again and be fine. It makes a lovely winter here but I miss all the seasons. Especially red and yellow and orange and white :)

#16 mattknepley

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 05:59 AM

I remember feeling that way 20 years ago. Now I could never see one again and be fine. It makes a lovely winter here but I miss all the seasons. Especially red and yellow and orange and white :)


Know whatcha mean. I am happy and grateful to be in my little chunk o' SC, and plan to be here for the next 15 - 20 years at least. But I'm a small town Northern kid and there's no getting away from it. The blessing of having a deep sense of "place" is sometimes its challenge, I suppose...
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#17 gerald

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 08:54 AM

I remember how exciting it was to see the first blades of grass poking through the snow each spring (in western Mass).  But 18 years in a state with NO lizards and very limited fish fauna was enough ... i had to come south.  Didn't know about chiggers when I moved here; that was a rude awakening.  And I do miss the rocky tidepools and wood turtles of New England.

 

I've never tried growing Chara in fish tanks, but Nitella and Najas are both good, provided your water is not too soft.


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#18 Cricket

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 04:31 PM

Know whatcha mean. I am happy and grateful to be in my little chunk o' SC, and plan to be here for the next 15 - 20 years at least. But I'm a small town Northern kid and there's no getting away from it. The blessing of having a deep sense of "place" is sometimes its challenge, I suppose...

I know exactly what you mean too. Our last trip up north.[attachment=18938:FB_IMG_1506460512846.jpg][attachment=18939:FB_IMG_1506460437034.jpg][attachment=18940:FB_IMG_1506460282365.jpg] I look forward to moving back someday. But life seems to be a trip downstream. Going back isn't nearly as easy.

I remember how exciting it was to see the first blades of grass poking through the snow each spring (in western Mass).  But 18 years in a state with NO lizards and very limited fish fauna was enough ... i had to come south.  Didn't know about chiggers when I moved here; that was a rude awakening.  And I do miss the rocky tidepools and wood turtles of New England.
 
I've never tried growing Chara in fish tanks, but Nitella and Najas are both good, provided your water is not too soft.


I'm afraid to ask? Chiggers??? I could say the same thing I think about the roaches. And scorpions :/

I have hard water so maybe I'll give it a go in and aquarium of its own. Thanks for all the help !

#19 mattknepley

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Posted 28 September 2017 - 04:19 AM

That's gorgeous. No wonder you miss it. Funny how some people can live in a place all their lives and never see it; and others can be somewhere just a very short while and a place becomes part of who they are. The good news is, sometimes you have to be gone long enough for home not to be home anymore before you can go back.
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#20 Cricket

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Posted 29 September 2017 - 01:37 PM

That's gorgeous. No wonder you miss it. Funny how some people can live in a place all their lives and never see it; and others can be somewhere just a very short while and a place becomes part of who they are. The good news is, sometimes you have to be gone long enough for home not to be home anymore before you can go back.

looking forward :)



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