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Identification Assistance


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#1 pitt20

pitt20
  • NANFA Guest
  • PA

Posted 19 October 2017 - 07:04 PM

When I was sampling in Florida I caught a small sunfish. It was dark in color and about an inch long. It had uniform rows of small spots that were visible upon close inspection. Would anyone know what this could possibly be? It was caught in the blackwater river drainage in Milton, FL. I was thinking redspotted sunfish just based on the spots but I'm not very good at identifying very small sunfish.

#2 gerald

gerald
  • Global Moderator
  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 19 October 2017 - 07:39 PM

Even WITH decent pics baby sunfish are tricky to ID.  "Dark with spots" ???  Come on pitt, we need more than THAT to go on!

Even some normally light-colored species can turn quite dark in dark-colored water.

How about the shape of rear edge of tail?  rounded (convex), flat/straight, concave (emarginate)?


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#3 pitt20

pitt20
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  • PA

Posted 19 October 2017 - 10:03 PM

The tail was concave. I know it's not Enneacanthus because I caught a bluespotted sunfish in the same net and they were very distinct. Based on the species in the drainage I was in it could be a bluegill, redspotted, spotted, green, dollar, redear, or longear. The water was very dark so that could have factored into the dark color.


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#4 Michael Wolfe

Michael Wolfe
  • Board of Directors
  • North Georgia, Oconee River Drainage

Posted 20 October 2017 - 07:23 AM

If the sides of the fish were SPOTTED... my friend Occam would be willing to tell you...
Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin

#5 Dustin

Dustin
  • Forum Staff

Posted 20 October 2017 - 07:41 AM

I thought that there were only spotteds in FL, no redspotted.  


Dustin Smith
At the convergence of the Broad, Saluda and Congaree
Lexington, SC


#6 centrarchid

centrarchid
  • NANFA Member

Posted 20 October 2017 - 12:30 PM

Picture is a must.  Time wasting otherwise.


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