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Bass and darter help, please


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#1 mattknepley

mattknepley
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  • Smack-dab between the Savannah and the Saluda.

Posted 19 February 2018 - 04:27 PM

Made a brief, and I mean brief, stop in Victoria Bryant State Park, Franklin County, Georgia today. Swung the dipnet and dragged the seine through Rice Creek at the ford. Didn't turn up many fishes, but maybe a lifer for me. Or two.

I'm thinking Spotted Bass on this one, which would actually be a lifer. Not thinking Redeye because of lack of white on caudal edges. I'm not sure enough to rule out Smallmouth, though, and don't know the fishes of the drainage. And Peterson's is packed away.

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Ok, you've had two good photos, so here's the usual Knepley quality picture. This is honestly the best focus my camera would give me, and this right after the bass pics which were pretty good. Obviously a Percina of some type; looks P. nigrofasciata in the pic, but it struck me as more P. crassa in person on account of the "tire track" marks on dorsal half of the fish. (Which you can't see in the photo.) Only P. crassa doesn't get to Savannah drainages. Care to take a stab at it?

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Matt Knepley
"No thanks, a third of a gopher would merely arouse my appetite..."

#2 centrarchid

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Posted 19 February 2018 - 07:15 PM

I think your bass is a Redeye Bass.  It does not look Smallmouth Bass I am familiar with.  Not a Spotted bass as that species does not have the markings radiating from the nose.  It has a lot of red in rear fins.


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#3 Michael Wolfe

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Posted 19 February 2018 - 09:29 PM

I agree, it looks really similar to the Coosa... but I think the ones over there are split out as Bartram's Bass now.


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#4 Mike

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Posted 19 February 2018 - 09:45 PM

Did Bartram's Bass get full recognition as a species yet?


Mike Berg
Northwest Indiana

#5 Michael Wolfe

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Posted 19 February 2018 - 11:23 PM

http://fishesofgeorg...cies&class=fish

 

This is still showing it as "Micropterus sp. cf. M. coosae" but I thought there was a paper for some of these splits that Bud published.


Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin

#6 mattknepley

mattknepley
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Posted 20 February 2018 - 06:34 AM

Thanks, guys.

Putting the picture up on one half the screen and scrolling down through here http://georgiawildli.../identificationon the other half, Bartram's Bass does seem the most likely. Am I correct in thinking that Bartram's and Altamaha will be split from each other, and that sp. cf. cataractae is a previous split from coosae?

Criminy, who knew there were so many basses? ;)
Matt Knepley
"No thanks, a third of a gopher would merely arouse my appetite..."

#7 Dustin

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Posted 21 February 2018 - 08:44 AM

Darter is for sure nigrofasciata.  They are thick over there.


Dustin Smith
At the convergence of the Broad, Saluda and Congaree
Lexington, SC


#8 mattknepley

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Posted 21 February 2018 - 08:42 PM

Thanks, Dustin. The more I see that pic the more I realize it was just wishful thinking that it might've been something new for me...
Matt Knepley
"No thanks, a third of a gopher would merely arouse my appetite..."

#9 Matt DeLaVega

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Posted 21 February 2018 - 09:14 PM

So, if you are like me, and didn't even know there were black bass splits going on, this is a Coosa, or redeye bass essentially? Darn close? Is the split accepted?


The member formerly known as Skipjack


#10 fundulus

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Posted 22 February 2018 - 10:34 AM

The split is widely accepted.


Bruce Stallsmith, Huntsville, Alabama, US of A

#11 centrarchid

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Posted 22 February 2018 - 11:54 AM

I have no reason to split the black basses until the far superior Bluegill is treated in a similar manner by gel jockeys.  Some things are just way more obvious.


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#12 mattknepley

mattknepley
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Posted 22 February 2018 - 04:30 PM

I have no reason to split the black basses until the far superior Bluegill is treated in a similar manner by gel jockeys.  Some things are just way more obvious.


lol ;P
Matt Knepley
"No thanks, a third of a gopher would merely arouse my appetite..."

#13 FirstChAoS

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Posted 14 April 2018 - 10:10 PM

I have no reason to split the black basses until the far superior Bluegill is treated in a similar manner by gel jockeys.  Some things are just way more obvious.

 

 

Not until a full examination of the "pterocephalus" (wingheads, my term for the huge operculums on them) redbreasts and the northern ones to see if they are subspecies or just regional variation.

 

Also why are all the northeastern Arctic Char one subspecies when each shows adaptations to a different diet in their lake. Sometimes even different spawning methods.


Edited by FirstChAoS, 14 April 2018 - 10:12 PM.





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