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Acclimation from hard to soft water.


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#1 dsuperman

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 10:53 AM

The presentation summary by Jenny Kruckenberg in the American Currents publication [fall 2017]  mentions Ray katula speaking of water parameters. In terms of acclimation, which is easier for fish ,going from hard to soft water or soft to hard water?  NYC tap water is usually PH 6.8 - 7.0 with moderately soft water.



#2 blakemarkwell

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 03:59 PM

Species adapted to moderately hard water (GH) have ion-uptake channels in their cells (especially rich in their gills) that are adapted to those concentrations and a change from mid/high GH to low/no GH (ultra soft) might be troublesome. I believe most species that come from blackwater (low GH) do fine in harder water but spawning behaviors, egg maturation, etc might be inhibited. Also, keep in mind that water with low KH (alkalinity) and a heavy bio-load (big fish and/or lots of small fish) can cause the pH to crash due to the large amount of nitrification (releases H+) using up the small amount of KH present in the initial water.

 

I'm not sure what Ray Katula concluded with his presentation, though. Hopefully someone can fill you in.


Blake Markwell
Sangamon River

#3 gerald

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  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 07 March 2018 - 06:19 PM

Agree with Blake.  Soft to hard transition is usually no problem for N. American fish; we really don't have any hard-core obligate soft water species like S. Amer does.  Hard to soft transition requires cellular changes for uptaking vital ions at lower concentrations; those changes may take days or weeks.

 

Species adapted to moderately hard water (GH) have ion-uptake channels in their cells (especially rich in their gills) that are adapted to those concentrations and a change from mid/high GH to low/no GH (ultra soft) might be troublesome. I believe most species that come from blackwater (low GH) do fine in harder water but spawning behaviors, egg maturation, etc might be inhibited. Also, keep in mind that water with low KH (alkalinity) and a heavy bio-load (big fish and/or lots of small fish) can cause the pH to crash due to the large amount of nitrification (releases H+) using up the small amount of KH present in the initial water.

 

I'm not sure what Ray Katula concluded with his presentation, though. Hopefully someone can fill you in.


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#4 blakemarkwell

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 09:30 PM

Gerald has vicariously taught me well!  O:)


Blake Markwell
Sangamon River

#5 dsuperman

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 09:33 PM

Thanks Blake and Gerald.Thought i knew this years ago but couldn't remember which way was which! Just in my case being in NYC with soft water when i was shipping tropicals many times it was to buyers with hard water,i always told all buyers to acclimate regardless. I acclimate my fish when i'm moving them from tank to tank,if the temps. right ,i know i probably don't have to,but i still do!  I've heard some fishkeepers say they don't acclimate at all if the temps. close,they just net and dump.



#6 blakemarkwell

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 07:56 AM

And yes, if you're not satisfied with the hardness of your soft tap water, you can also increase the GH by adding a ready made product such as "Salty Shrimp Bee Shrimp Mineral GH+" or a similar product made for Rift Lake cichlids. There are also products such as Salty Shrimp GH+/KH+ that will increase both GH and KH (alkalinity = buffering capacity). Of course, you could always use specific ionic compounds to achieve the same result although it will require more homework to keep the divalent cations (=GH) in balance. I know some folks have good luck increases the KH (buffering capacity) of their water by adding some aragonite/crushed coral. My water is liquid rock so I have the opposite problem!


Blake Markwell
Sangamon River

#7 dsuperman

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 01:01 PM

Good tips,thanks. I don't usually keep anything that isn't happy in my water. On the rare occasions that i do feel the need to increase hardness i've used crushed coral,oyster shells,clamshells, epsom salt,kosher salt and baking soda.



#8 gerald

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 02:35 PM

coral, shells, aragonite ---> raises both KH and GH (Ca + Mg) - what I use mostly

epsom salt ---> raises GH (only Mg, no Ca); no effect on KH

baking soda ---> raises KH only; no effect on GH

kosher salt ---> no effect on either GH or KH; raises conductivity


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#9 dsuperman

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 11:04 PM

Well, three out of four aint bad. LOL. Seriously, i've been using kosher salt  here in NYC  for 50-55 years and i've long since forgotten why!



#10 gerald

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  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 09 March 2018 - 03:43 PM

Because Na+ and Cl- are very important ions for fish too!  But they're not relevant to alkalinity or hardness.

... and of course fish taste better with salt.


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel





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