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Venice, LA, 5/20/18


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#1 brackishdude

brackishdude
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Posted 22 May 2018 - 11:02 PM

I keep a 180 gal brackish tank that I converted to native a couple of years ago as my kids got old enough to take an interest.  We've made many collecting trips to Lake Pontchartrain and along the Louisiana gulf coast
 
We keep baby Mullet, striped Killi, marsh Killi, least Killi, diamond killis, Blue fin Killi, Rainwater Killi, sheepshead Minnow, inland silversides, hermit crabs, code goby, sailfin molly, jade goby, and mosquito fish.
 
I keep the tank at about 1.005-7 specific gravity
 
My son and I went fishing for redfish and speckled trout (did very well) in the marshes at the mouth of the Mississippi, and had some time to do some collecting too.  I checked the water at several spots and the sg was around 1.005
 
Thanks to Kevin Wilson, aka Chasmodes, for the tip on scooping up shells to look for cling fish.  I caught three 1-1.5 inchers!
 
Cast netting in a shallow land-locked pond out at the last jetty that was very hot and filthy looking brought in loads of sheeps head minnows, baby mullet, and striped killie fish (all of which I already have)
 
But it also produced a single male Adinia xenica, the diamond killi ( I already had a single female).  I believe his tail will grow back

Attached Images

  • Capture6.JPG

Edited by brackishdude, 22 May 2018 - 11:21 PM.


#2 brackishdude

brackishdude
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Posted 22 May 2018 - 11:08 PM

We cast netted from the boat over an area of hard packed sand in 3-4 feet of water, bringing in 13-15 Bay Anchovies, which seem to fill the same tank-space role as the inland silversides: mid-tank docile schoolers.

http://txmarspecies....cinameID=Anchoamitchilli

Capture.JPG

Only two survived, one less lucky shown above, but imagine my surprise on seeing the survivors in the tank

#3 brackishdude

brackishdude
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Posted 22 May 2018 - 11:18 PM

Capture7.JPG


Many thanks to our host Tommy, who tolerated us graciously, even when we used time that could have been used for "Real Fishing"

#4 Irate Mormon

Irate Mormon
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  • Crooked Creek, Mississippi

Posted 23 May 2018 - 05:51 PM

Sounds like a blast - It's been quite a while since I've been down that way.


-The member currently known as Irate Mormon


#5 Matt DeLaVega

Matt DeLaVega
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  • Ohio

Posted 23 May 2018 - 06:55 PM

Like


The member formerly known as Skipjack


#6 Michael Wolfe

Michael Wolfe
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  • North Georgia, Oconee River Drainage

Posted 23 May 2018 - 07:52 PM

Dont go all trendy on me DLV. I will have to ban you.
Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin

#7 Chasmodes

Chasmodes
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  • Central Maryland

Posted 24 May 2018 - 10:58 AM

That's quite a collecting trip!  Those diamond killis look really cool.  Congrats on finding some skilletfish!!!  I bet if the salinity at those spots creeps up, you'll find blennies at that location.  They tend to like it a bit more salty, about an SG of 1.010 or more.

 

Like

 

Dont go all trendy on me DLV. I will have to ban you.

 

:biggrin:  :biggrin:  :biggrin:


Kevin Wilson


#8 brackishdude

brackishdude
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Posted 24 May 2018 - 10:28 PM

I've never been one to prejudge a fish by it's religion

Last summer we went out to deep water and caught several 4-6ft king mackerel, so I think you'd be right about the adults. But for hundreds of miles around the Mississippi delta and even most of the rest of the marshy gulf coast where creeks and smaller rivers empty, there is an astounding mix of FW and SW fish. Very common in the marsh areas to catch a redfish on one cast, and a bass on the next. I scooped up a clump of water hyacinth on the gulf side of the outermost jetty this trip and it had a crawfish! I imagine many "purely salt water" fish spend much of their early lives there.


Here is the current salt water distribution on the east and west sides of the river.

The western/southern red circle is where the tide-locked pond was and where our collecting was most salty. We stopped at several places from there due north to the river where we were staying. The northern/eastern circle is where we caught redfish after redfish.

https://saveourlake....ydrocoast-maps/

Capture9.JPG

Capture8.JPG

cling fish? where did that come from? yes, I meant skillet fish!

#9 brackishdude

brackishdude
  • NANFA Member

Posted 24 May 2018 - 10:37 PM

this is a satellite view of the outer jetty with the tide-locked pond. circled in red.

We launched from empire and fished/collected from there to the jetty

Capture11.JPG

that's a boat for scale

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#10 Chasmodes

Chasmodes
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  • Central Maryland

Posted 25 May 2018 - 07:03 AM

cling fish? where did that come from? yes, I meant skillet fish!

 

Saul Goodman (It's all good man)!  A skilletfish is a clingfish, so by definition, you were correct :)


Kevin Wilson


#11 Michael Wolfe

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  • North Georgia, Oconee River Drainage

Posted 25 May 2018 - 12:36 PM

Cleaned this thread up a bit at the suggestion of several posters.


Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin



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