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Sunfish id


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#1 Ken Kilby

Ken Kilby
  • NANFA Member
  • Georgia, Upper Flint

Posted 28 June 2018 - 09:43 AM

I caught about twenty of these in a little wash tub size pool.  Kind of surprised me.  Any ideas?  Other than learn how to take a decent picture.

 

gallery_21831_106_1266358.jpeg



#2 gerald

gerald
  • Global Moderator
  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 28 June 2018 - 11:59 AM

I've seen worse pics ... (but not much worse).  Might be redbreast, pumpkinseed, longear, dollar ?  You didn't tell us where it was caught - what spp are in range?


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#3 Ken Kilby

Ken Kilby
  • NANFA Member
  • Georgia, Upper Flint

Posted 28 June 2018 - 12:11 PM

Central Georgia.  Upper Flint drainage.  My best guess from looking at the juvenile pictures in my book is redbreast.  This is a tiny creek, not much more flow that a good garden hose.

 

Here is another equally bad pic with a different angle.

 

gallery_21831_106_61867.jpg



#4 gerald

gerald
  • Global Moderator
  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 28 June 2018 - 12:34 PM

i agree -- most likely redbreast


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#5 lilyea

lilyea
  • NANFA Member
  • Peace River Watershed, Central Florida, USA

Posted 03 July 2018 - 09:06 AM

How many different types of sunfish have the blue striped pattern on the head (see first pic above)? I have seen it on Pumpkinseeds and am not sure what other sunfish have these markings.

#6 Michael Wolfe

Michael Wolfe
  • Board of Directors
  • North Georgia, Oconee River Drainage

Posted 03 July 2018 - 04:31 PM

Redbreast have those kid of blue green vermiculations on the face.
Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin

#7 Ken Kilby

Ken Kilby
  • NANFA Member
  • Georgia, Upper Flint

Posted 03 July 2018 - 05:06 PM

I looked at my Peterson guide and it seems to me like the stripes on the face are more common than not.  It is easier to see the species with them than to say for sure they don't.  Maybe Bluegill doesn't.

 

I have been really curious about these fish.  They live approximately 3 miles upstream from water that you would think could support a full grown bream.  Do they eventually make their way to the river?  Do they hang out in the little headwater pools until the coons eat the bulk of them? To get down stream in normal flow they would have to traverse water less than an inch deep, in some places way less than an inch.  Maybe they flush out with heavy rains?  

 

Do people normally find them in little creeks like this?

 

They were right below this little rock slide and right below their pool is another slide just like this one.  The creek comes out of the ground a couple hundred yards up the hill from where this picture was taken.

 

gallery_21831_106_1430695.jpg



#8 Michael Wolfe

Michael Wolfe
  • Board of Directors
  • North Georgia, Oconee River Drainage

Posted 03 July 2018 - 10:23 PM

yes, yes, yes, yes (all this true especially for redbreast here in Georgia)


Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin

#9 gerald

gerald
  • Global Moderator
  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 04 July 2018 - 09:36 AM

In NC, greens are the sunfish that I find farthest up the small tribs, but redbreast and bluegill are not far behind.  I've never seen redbreast nests in creeks less than 8 ft average width, but I suspect the juveniles disperse in all directions - some of them far upstream.  Little headwater creeks can be highly productive for fish food bugs; a good place to grow up before moving to a bigger creek to breed.


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#10 JasonL

JasonL
  • NANFA Member
  • Kentucky

Posted 04 July 2018 - 10:45 AM

Greens are common in the tiny creeks where I live. I've found them after rainstorms in headwater pools and drainage ditches that are completely dry much of the year. Creek chubs too. Think it must be in their DNA to search out places like this and hope they get lucky.




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