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Keeping gizzard shad in a tank?


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#1 Fleendar the Magnificent

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Posted 24 December 2018 - 04:36 PM

I was out today and caught a nice and pretty 3" gizzard shad. How difficult are these herring-like fish to keep and will they learn to take blood worms, flakes and other frozen foods? I've had him home in an aerated bucket for about 45 minutes and plan to let him gradually warm up to room temperature. Any advice on this fish and getting it acclimatized?

 

Thanks

 

Chris

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#2 Matt DeLaVega

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Posted 24 December 2018 - 06:55 PM

Never tried it myself, but cat fishermen have a hard time keeping them alive for bait. I hear round containers are better than square. They are super active, and without green water or constant feeding, I don't imagine they will hang around long. I could be very wrong though.


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#3 Fleendar the Magnificent

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Posted 24 December 2018 - 07:26 PM

Well, all I can do is try. Some of the things I read online a bit ago said that some have taken blood worms and flakes, but apparently they are about the ultimate challenge any fish keeper can take on. I guess that they're extremely fragile, sensitive and nervous. Some shiners are like that too.



#4 JasonL

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Posted 24 December 2018 - 07:34 PM

Based on my experience with threadfin shad I think success is unlikely but keep us appraised.

#5 Matt DeLaVega

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Posted 24 December 2018 - 08:16 PM

The only thing I have heard of that is close to as difficult is brook silversides. Once the transport is done, apparently brook silversides do alright. The difficulty is just beginning with shad. Hope you crack the code.


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#6 Moontanman

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Posted 25 December 2018 - 09:25 AM

I was out today and caught a nice and pretty 3" gizzard shad. How difficult are these herring-like fish to keep and will they learn to take blood worms, flakes and other frozen foods? I've had him home in an aerated bucket for about 45 minutes and plan to let him gradually warm up to room temperature. Any advice on this fish and getting it acclimatized?

 

Thanks

 

Chris

 

I've kept threadfin shad, I started out with 1 inch individuals, they grew like weeds and were very pretty. I fed them Hikari Micro Pellets. They got used to eating the micro pellets quickly. I kept them in a 125 with plenty of aeration, easy to keep IMHO. 

 

The only thing I have heard of that is close to as difficult is brook silversides. Once the transport is done, apparently brook silversides do alright. The difficulty is just beginning with shad. Hope you crack the code.

 

I've kept and even shipped inland silversides, they ke seemed to be catching them at a very small size, around one inch. They also fed well on the micro pellets.. 


Michael

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#7 Matt DeLaVega

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Posted 25 December 2018 - 10:54 AM

 

I've kept threadfin shad, I started out with 1 inch individuals, they grew like weeds and were very pretty. I fed them Hikari Micro Pellets. They got used to eating the micro pellets quickly. I kept them in a 125 with plenty of aeration, easy to keep IMHO. 

 

 

I've kept and even shipped inland silversides, they ke seemed to be catching them at a very small size, around one inch. They also fed well on the micro pellets.. 

Maybe the larger tank helped? Most people are probably trying them in smaller tanks.


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#8 Moontanman

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Posted 25 December 2018 - 04:22 PM

Maybe the larger tank helped? Most people are probably trying them in smaller tanks.

 

 

Probably did help, they are easy to feed for sure!


Michael

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#9 Fleendar the Magnificent

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Posted 25 December 2018 - 05:57 PM

Well, the shad didn't make it more than about 5 hours in the tank. Not sure why these fish are so prone to dying, but they are extremely fragile. He seemed to do OK during the transport as I am only 5 mins from the river, and he seemed to be OK in the 5 gallon bucket for the 6 hours once home and inside, but apparently acclimatizing him to the tank  was too much. Was hoping he'd make it. Quite pretty with that blue/green spot on it.



#10 NotCousteau

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Posted 28 December 2018 - 02:52 PM

Sorry to hear that. I remember how enamored I was with gizzard shads when I went fishing as a skid. Loved their look, shine and color.



#11 Fleendar the Magnificent

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Posted 28 December 2018 - 03:23 PM

It happens with these fish. I guess that they're about the ultimate challenge to keep. I thought it was really pretty being a super bright and flashy silver with blue/green spots on each side of the gill opercula. Live and learn I guess. Some fish just aren't meant for aquariums.



#12 Matt DeLaVega

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Posted 28 December 2018 - 03:58 PM

It happens with these fish. I guess that they're about the ultimate challenge to keep. I thought it was really pretty being a super bright and flashy silver with blue/green spots on each side of the gill opercula. Live and learn I guess. Some fish just aren't meant for aquariums.

Aquarium size may be the ticket.


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#13 brackishdude

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Posted 29 December 2018 - 10:06 AM

I keep a 180 gallon brackish tank for small natives, 1.004–1.007, that includes many South Louisiana fresh water fish known to tolerate light brackish, including mollies, inland silversides, mosquito fish, and least Killi.  

I frequently collect in the local ponds around Baton Rouge for grass shrimp, and all of the above are commonly netted.  My bucket is always filled with tank water, with a battery-powered aerator, so that acclimation can begin immediately.  Usually, the tank water is also cooler, which I think helps.

I have caught both gizzard and threadfin shad as well.  I have never been able to keep the threadfin alive more than 24 hours.  It is the much preferred fish to me, since it stays relatively small.  Gizzards can get huge and usually tolerate acclimation without difficulty, but often slowly dwindle, similar to the inland silversides, whose numbers decline slowly over 12-18 months.  The gizzards also tend to lose their beautiful shine and just begin to look unhealthy over time.



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