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My Darter Aquariums Videos


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#1 Darter keeper

Darter keeper
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  • Near the Ozarks

Posted 16 February 2019 - 08:54 PM

Here's my channel where you can currently see my old darter aquariums & my current one (there'll be more videos in the future ahead)

https://www.youtube....RWV05ccbvd3k-jg

((ps you can read the descriptions for more info))

#2 Doug_Dame

Doug_Dame
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Posted 17 February 2019 - 02:33 AM

I've recently discovered that ZooMed introduced a "frag tank" a couple of years ago. (What can I say, I'm not real well connected to the conventional aquarium hobby and it's products, so trickle-down takes a while.) The tank has a 48x24 footprint but is only 10" tall ... I think it'd make a great darter tank, because you can easily get a circular flow in it, and have a moderate velocity without much effort, i.e., modest pumps. (And none of the darters I ever had were jumpers.) 

 

Your YouTube channel is up to one subscriber. And you have a Like.  O:)


Doug Dame

Floridian now back in Florida
 


#3 Fleendar the Magnificent

Fleendar the Magnificent
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  • Ohio

Posted 17 February 2019 - 02:54 PM

I like! I have a 29 gallon tank that I keep mine in. Lots of plants, rocks, some shells and a large maple branch for them. My banded and Johnny darters love to sit on the branch while the rainbow and fantail darters stay on the bottom. I don't have any current or powerhead in the tank, so the current there is happens to be from the air bubble curtain. Despite having no current, the darters seem to be quite happy.

That said, I'd still recommend a canopy for the tank. While my darters aren't jumpers, the western blacknose dace and stonerollers ARE. I hear fish head bangs on the canopy a lot in the evenings.



#4 Josh Blaylock

Josh Blaylock
  • Board of Directors
  • Central Kentucky

Posted 18 February 2019 - 09:55 AM

I've recently discovered that ZooMed introduced a "frag tank" a couple of years ago. (What can I say, I'm not real well connected to the conventional aquarium hobby and it's products, so trickle-down takes a while.) The tank has a 48x24 footprint but is only 10" tall ... I think it'd make a great darter tank, because you can easily get a circular flow in it, and have a moderate velocity without much effort, i.e., modest pumps. (And none of the darters I ever had were jumpers.) 

 

Your YouTube channel is up to one subscriber. And you have a Like.  O:)

 

 

If you can get your hands on a 33L, that would make a great high flow darter tank.  It has the same footprint as a 55, so finding a stand and such would be easy, but they are only 12-13in tall.

 

They are hard to find, but I once found a seller on Amazon, ordered the 33L long.  The seller put the aquarium in a cardboard box and shipped it, from CA to KY.  Needless to say, it arrived in about 10,000 pieces.


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#5 Michael Wolfe

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  • North Georgia, Oconee River Drainage

Posted 18 February 2019 - 10:23 AM

They are hard to find, but I once found a seller on Amazon, ordered the 33L long.  The seller put the aquarium in a cardboard box and shipped it, from CA to KY.  Needless to say, it arrived in about 10,000 pieces.

 

Giving a whole new meaning to "frag tank"


Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin

#6 Doug_Dame

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Posted 18 February 2019 - 09:21 PM

I have three 33Ls !!! Each of which has, unlike yours, the conventional expected rectangular shape and size. That's a pretty funny (sad) story, hope you got a refund.  

 

One I spotted in an obscure corner of a LFS, the second I ordered from that dealer, and the third I bought from a local fish club guy who was downsizing. He'd had it maybe 3 or 4 years, and it was still in the original factory wrapper. Coincidentally, if things go according to plan, I'll have water in it for the first time this coming weekend.

 

They make very nice riffle tanks, but unless you do a "river flow manifold", any current you create at one end just degenerates into chaotic turbulence at the other. (Not that that's necessarily bad.) I like that size tank a lot, that's why I have three. But the 48x24 footprint tanks make an oval pattern flow more easily.

 

The ZooMed Frag50s supposedly run from about $99 to $120, which is comparable to or cheaper than the 33Ls. Supposedly they're more readily available at salt water aquarium stores (coral frags). And they're dual-purpose as a herp tank. I have not seen one in the wild myself yet, only seen them on the www. 

 

(edited once for bad English)


Doug Dame

Floridian now back in Florida
 


#7 Doug_Dame

Doug_Dame
  • NANFA Member

Posted 18 February 2019 - 09:22 PM

 

Giving a whole new meaning to "frag tank"

 

LIKE. 


Doug Dame

Floridian now back in Florida
 


#8 CaptScot

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  • Shoreline CT

Posted 08 March 2019 - 01:42 PM

You can create good current in a rectangular tank without special plumbing. The trick is to divide the tank fairly well longitudinally. By having a good piece of structure running down the center of the tank, you divide the laminar flow between the front and the back. I.e. you don't create an eddy in the middle of the tank slowing down and breaking down the quality of the current you are trying to establish.

 

The best divider would be a piece of lexan or plexi that goes from top to bottom and is the same distance from the ends of the tank as the tank is half wide (iow, the "channel width" is preserved all around). You probably don't want to do that and you don't need to, I am just using that to explain how it works and that's the best case from creating current point of view. You just need a good piece of structure in the middle to create to distinct channels, one in the back and one in the front. It can be a round rock and that would work just fine, or a nice long but heavy piece of driftwood. The strongest current will be right in front of and right behind that piece of structure.

 

Then you just need one or two or more power heads to direct the water flow either clockwise or counter clockwise.






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