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Need help identifying this minnow


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#1 JoeDundee

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Posted 09 April 2019 - 07:33 AM

Caught this yesterday at Fishing River in Clay County, Missouri. I believe it is a Fathead Minnow but I'm not sure.

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#2 mattknepley

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Posted 09 April 2019 - 05:44 PM

Looks more Cyprinella-like than Pimphales to me but couldn't tell you which one.
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#3 JoeDundee

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Posted 09 April 2019 - 07:03 PM

The only Cyprinella in my area is the red shiner, and this looks nothing like one of those. Could be a notropis, but I think I've decided that this is a bluntnose minnow.

#4 JoeDundee

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Posted 09 April 2019 - 07:07 PM

I went back to the same spot today and caught this. at first I thought it looked more Cyprinella-like, but now I'm starting to think it's just a well fed specimen of what I've already been catching.Attached File  20190409_162740.jpg   101.81KB   3 downloads

Edited by JoeDundee, 09 April 2019 - 07:08 PM.


#5 Matt DeLaVega

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Posted 09 April 2019 - 07:33 PM

Has a deep body like a red shiner.


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#6 gerald

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Posted 09 April 2019 - 10:39 PM

I'd vote red shiner too.


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Hangin' on the Neuse
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#7 JasonL

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Posted 09 April 2019 - 10:50 PM

The second pic looks like a red shiner especially with the deep body and no distinct other markings currently. Red shiners are very common in that part of MO too. Males should start to color up in late spring and you'll know for sure then. Not a bluntnose minnow- they are more streamlined and have different scale and color patterns.

#8 JoeDundee

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 06:48 AM

Attached File  20190409_195726.jpg   133.92KB   3 downloadsAttached File  20181102_150201.jpg   136.7KB   2 downloadsAttached File  20190408_174216.jpg   105.2KB   2 downloads
So you re telling me that these are all the same species?

#9 Fleendar the Magnificent

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 04:44 PM

Definitely not a bluntnose minnow. Shiner of some kind for sure.



#10 JoeDundee

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 04:49 PM

So now I'm starting to think that some of these might be redfin shiner

#11 Matt DeLaVega

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 06:16 PM

Top and bottom fish may be Lythrurus. Check for black pigment at anterior base of dorsal fin. Middle fish screams Cyprinella.


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#12 JoeDundee

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 07:47 PM

Yeah I think you re right. Thank you for your help.

#13 Darter keeper

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 07:54 PM

The first one definitely looks like a female red shiner, the second photo looks kinda like Notropis blennius (River Shiner) or redfin, possibly a hybrid? (are hybrids between these two species possible?)
& the 3rd kinda looks like Notropis stramineus (Sand Shiner) with that stripe.

#14 JoeDundee

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 08:30 PM

Third one is definitely not sand Shiner. Sand shiner have more of a dotted lateral line

#15 Darter keeper

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 10:48 PM

The only other shiner I could think of that it looks similar enough to is the bigmouth Shiner possibly still transitioning into a adult or it has just been stressed out/lost color due to the high temps we got

https://www.google.c...=0P0uF23Zx59VrM

Edited by Darter keeper, 11 April 2019 - 10:49 PM.


#16 JoeDundee

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 06:32 AM

Definitely not a Notropis

#17 Matt DeLaVega

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 08:50 AM

I think you are right with redfin shiner. Easy to confirm if you raise the dorsal fin and look for pigment. It is not always as obvious as it is in this photo though. I believe I see a hint of it in your top photo.

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#18 gerald

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 09:23 AM

Lythrurus shiners (redfin, scarlet, etc) have small crowded anterior body scales, compared with rear half of body, as seen in Matt's photo.  In Joe's 3 photos the scales are all pretty close to the same size; no distinct change from front to back.


Gerald Pottern
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Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#19 Matt DeLaVega

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 12:38 PM

There are some of those big river shiners to think about. Ghost shiner, river shiner etc. People rarely sample them, and they are not often thought about.


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#20 itsme

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Posted 18 April 2019 - 10:39 PM

Cyprinella.






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