Jump to content


Photo

Collecting in Brackish Waters of North Carolina


8 replies to this topic

#1 Leo1234

Leo1234
  • NANFA Member
  • san clemente, california

Posted 26 May 2020 - 04:49 PM

I'm planning a trip to visit a friend in North Carolina sometime to go sampling/collecting. We've been trying to pick a spot, though it's been hard as I can't find a good list of what species are generally found in brackish water. While while the main reason for the trip is to visit my friend and learn more about the native fish of North Carolina, I had a few fish that if possible I'd like to collect and send back to my house in California. Spotted hake (Urophycis regius), Southern Hake (Urophycis floridana), and Inshore lizardfish (Synodus foetens) are the main fish I'm looking for and considering for a larger mid-high end brackish water aquarium. I also have heard River Goby  (Awaous banana) have been recorded in NC, though some websites seem to say it was only 1 specimen that was found that far north. I've done some fish sampling as part of a class before, but this is my first time doing it in freshwater/brackish water so I'd consider myself new to this.

 

Any tips or advice for collecting?
What species here found in brackish water?
Good spots to look?
Does brackish water spots usually fall under freshwater or saltwater regulations?
anyone have care experience with Spotted hake (Urophycis regius), Southern Hake (Urophycis floridana), or Inshore lizardfish (Synodus foetens)?

Thanks for the help and sorry for all the questions 



#2 Hecklad

Hecklad
  • NANFA Member
  • Ooltewah, TN

Posted 26 May 2020 - 05:59 PM

Sheepshead minnows, mummichogs, marsh killis, rainwater killis and mollies are all fairly common sp. Naked gobies I hear are common as well along the Atlantic coast, although how abundant they are around NC I have no idea. That's pretty much all I know about that though, other members can give you more detailed answers



#3 Doug_Dame

Doug_Dame
  • NANFA Member

Posted 26 May 2020 - 09:36 PM

Be careful working anyplace where there are oyster shells ... they're dastardly & treacherous scheming killer-devils. 


Doug Dame

Floridian now back in Florida
 


#4 Chasmodes

Chasmodes
  • NANFA Member
  • Central Maryland

Posted 27 May 2020 - 07:58 AM

If you find discarded oyster shells around popular shore fishing piers or boat ramps, scoop them up with your dip net.  You could possible catch several species of blennies, gobies and even skilletfish.  They're awesome aquarium fish, full of personality.  Here's a 20g tank that I had going last year:

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=aBDCkMxp4ucT

 

These fish were collected in the Chesapeake Bay.  They can be found in NC if the specific gravity is 1.009 or higher.  They hide in the shells.  Also, if you scoop up shells, bottles or anything that holds a hiding spot, check inside for fish.  The blenny species that you get should be crested blennies, feather blennies, and striped blennies.  There are several species of gobies there also.  You could catch any number of fish species depending on the salinity of the area that you are collecting.  

 

Good luck!


Kevin Wilson


#5 Leo1234

Leo1234
  • NANFA Member
  • san clemente, california

Posted 27 May 2020 - 05:29 PM

If you find discarded oyster shells around popular shore fishing piers or boat ramps, scoop them up with your dip net.  You could possible catch several species of blennies, gobies and even skilletfish.  They're awesome aquarium fish, full of personality.  Here's a 20g tank that I had going last year:

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=aBDCkMxp4ucT

 

These fish were collected in the Chesapeake Bay.  They can be found in NC if the specific gravity is 1.009 or higher.  They hide in the shells.  Also, if you scoop up shells, bottles or anything that holds a hiding spot, check inside for fish.  The blenny species that you get should be crested blennies, feather blennies, and striped blennies.  There are several species of gobies there also.  You could catch any number of fish species depending on the salinity of the area that you are collecting.  

 

Good luck!

that was a really cool tank you had! which blenny species did you have again? those looked really cool. I'll definitely look for some.

 

Sheepshead minnows, mummichogs, marsh killis, rainwater killis and mollies are all fairly common sp. Naked gobies I hear are common as well along the Atlantic coast, although how abundant they are around NC I have no idea. That's pretty much all I know about that though, other members can give you more detailed answers

mummichhogs and naked gobies would cool to see

 

Be careful working anyplace where there are oyster shells ... they're dastardly & treacherous scheming killer-devils. 

it's surprising how sharp they can be. They tend to be in the more rocky areas, right? I'm only familiar with oysters over here and I always think of them being in rocky shoreline areas (like tidepools) or attached to piers 



#6 Chasmodes

Chasmodes
  • NANFA Member
  • Central Maryland

Posted 27 May 2020 - 08:12 PM

that was a really cool tank you had! which blenny species did you have again? those looked really cool. I'll definitely look for some.

 

 

Thanks Leo!  I'll have larger version set up this summer.  I can't wait.  My blennies were striped blennies (Chasmodes bosquianus).  Yeah, they're very cool fish.  I can't wait to get more of them.


Kevin Wilson


#7 Doug_Dame

Doug_Dame
  • NANFA Member

Posted 28 May 2020 - 09:07 PM

 

it's surprising how sharp they can be. They tend to be in the more rocky areas, right? I'm only familiar with oysters over here and I always think of them being in rocky shoreline areas (like tidepools) or attached to piers 

 

I have found that the oysters you don't see are the most dangerous.

 

Blennies are fascinating and fun. I think they're at the higher-salt end of the brackish spectrum, though. Chasmodes has posted a number of videos showing his.


Doug Dame

Floridian now back in Florida
 


#8 Chasmodes

Chasmodes
  • NANFA Member
  • Central Maryland

Posted 29 May 2020 - 07:13 AM

 

I have found that the oysters you don't see are the most dangerous.

 

Blennies are fascinating and fun. I think they're at the higher-salt end of the brackish spectrum, though. Chasmodes has posted a number of videos showing his.

 

I've caught them as low as an SG of 1.008.  But, on those collections, my count was a bit lower than usual.  I think that it depends where the salt wedge is.  The further away it is, the less likely you'll find them at that SG.  In the Chesapeake, it all depends on the seasonal rainfall amounts.  It's a theory of mine that the closer it is, the more willing blennies will venture away from it to find good spawning locations.  I'll never be able to test it, and my evidence is anecdotal, not even that, just in my head.  I don't have the means to collect deeper waters nearby to test that theory.  My best numbers came when the SG was 1.010-1.012 at my spots.  And honestly, I didn't do as well when I headed South along the Bay, but I don't thing the SG was the issue.  Rather, I didn't find public spots with the right habitat.

 

If you find an oyster reef, netting them might be tough.  I think trapping them is the best bet, unless you can pick up the actual oyster cultches and get them to exit the cultch into your bucket.  My problem collecting around live oysters was that the oysters catch on the net, slowing down your net and allowing the critters to escape.


Kevin Wilson


#9 Leo1234

Leo1234
  • NANFA Member
  • san clemente, california

Posted 03 June 2020 - 03:08 PM

I've seen reports that Sargassumfish  (Histrio histrio) are also found in brackish water too? Anyone have experience with Spotted hake (Urophycis regius), Southern Hake (Urophycis floridana), Sargassumfish  (Histrio histrio)  and Inshore lizardfish (Synodus foetens)





Reply to this topic



  


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users