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30 Gallon Native Tank


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#1 Linkasaurus

Linkasaurus
  • NANFA Guest
  • Kentucky

Posted 31 July 2022 - 03:12 PM

Hey y'all, so I've been looking at starting a new 30 gallon native fish tank, but I don't know where to start. I want the tank to be creek based, so 3-4 creek centered minnows. Two of the species I'm wanting to put in the tank are a madtom, and some blackstripe topminnows. The other's I'm not sure, because I don't know what fish would work well with those two. I also don't know how I would set the tank up. I'm aware I need a heater, filter, and lights, but the other things are unknown. If y'all could gimme some help with this, I'd appreciate it. Thanks.

#2 swampfish

swampfish
  • NANFA Member

Posted 04 August 2022 - 11:33 AM

I think you will find that a tank of native fish will be as interesting as tropical fish tanks. The only real difference is that native fish tanks typically do not need heaters. Any local Kentucky fish you put in your tank will be able to handle temperatures from the 40's to the high 70's degree F. So siting the tank indoors from your living area to the basement should provide a reasonable temperature.

 

Provide a substrate and structure in the tank. To keep a more natural theme, I generally use brown or a natural mix with various shades of brown and lighter colored gravel. Include rocks and driftwood, or artificial rocks and driftwood purchased at aquarium stores to provide structure in the tank. Rocks that you collect may contain toxic minerals, but those found in water bodies with healthy native fish populations should be fine in your tank. include living or artificial plants. Furnish your tank as you see fit. If you prefer brightly colored aquarium ornaments and gravel, the fish will generally not care any more than do tropical fish. 

 

Native fish will do well in dechlorinated water just as do tropical fish. If you are unfamiliar with treating your tap water, consult your local aquarium store. 

 

With a madtom and blackstriped topminnows, you have selected fish that are compatible with many minnows. These are fish associated with no to gentle water current, so fish with similar preferences will be best. Southern redbelly dace prefer slow-moving water, grow into the same size range as your other fish, are common in Kentucky, and are very colorful. Generally shiners, dace, and other minnows like to school with at least half a dozen of their own kind and ignore other fish, so any of them that you keep will likely be good tankmates. These can be collected from local ponds or streams with a fishing license or purchased from a vendor such as Jonah's Aquarium. Even bait shop minnows, usually fathead minnows or golden shiners, will be compatible with your topminnows and madtom. 

 

Phil Nixon

Illinois



#3 Linkasaurus

Linkasaurus
  • NANFA Guest
  • Kentucky

Posted Yesterday, 01:32 PM

I think you will find that a tank of native fish will be as interesting as tropical fish tanks. The only real difference is that native fish tanks typically do not need heaters. Any local Kentucky fish you put in your tank will be able to handle temperatures from the 40's to the high 70's degree F. So siting the tank indoors from your living area to the basement should provide a reasonable temperature.
 
Provide a substrate and structure in the tank. To keep a more natural theme, I generally use brown or a natural mix with various shades of brown and lighter colored gravel. Include rocks and driftwood, or artificial rocks and driftwood purchased at aquarium stores to provide structure in the tank. Rocks that you collect may contain toxic minerals, but those found in water bodies with healthy native fish populations should be fine in your tank. include living or artificial plants. Furnish your tank as you see fit. If you prefer brightly colored aquarium ornaments and gravel, the fish will generally not care any more than do tropical fish. 
 
Native fish will do well in dechlorinated water just as do tropical fish. If you are unfamiliar with treating your tap water, consult your local aquarium store. 
 
With a madtom and blackstriped topminnows, you have selected fish that are compatible with many minnows. These are fish associated with no to gentle water current, so fish with similar preferences will be best. Southern redbelly dace prefer slow-moving water, grow into the same size range as your other fish, are common in Kentucky, and are very colorful. Generally shiners, dace, and other minnows like to school with at least half a dozen of their own kind and ignore other fish, so any of them that you keep will likely be good tankmates. These can be collected from local ponds or streams with a fishing license or purchased from a vendor such as Jonah's Aquarium. Even bait shop minnows, usually fathead minnows or golden shiners, will be compatible with your topminnows and madtom. 
 
Phil Nixon
Illinois

Thanks for this. I've decided the other two fish I get will be rosyface shiners and southern red-bellied dace. All I need to do now is get the tank designed and get all of the electrical aspects finished.

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