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My Inverts


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#1 Guest_IndianaNatives_*

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Posted 10 November 2008 - 06:36 PM

A few aquatic worms found their way into my tank when I collected my gravel,
they're all set with their mud tubes and they're pooping away.
Kinda neat to watch, they're really flighty too when I open the tank lid it sucks back in it's hole.
I also acquired a sowbug with my gravel,
my snails are laying their eggs too.
There are also some kind of larvae, I'm still waiting to find out what they are, I'm such a newbie with these macros.

I'm waiting until spring to get my fish,
my aquatic plants weren't aquatic... and I'd rather wait till it's a little warmer to go out anyway, it iced the other day!
Ah I can't take this cold weather.

#2 Guest_BTDarters_*

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 04:55 AM

Yeah, this cold weather stinks! I went out collecting yesterday, thinking it was about 40 degrees out. On the way back to the car from the stream, my dip net froze to my bucket! I guess it wasn't 40 degrees!

#3 Guest_fishlvr_*

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 06:06 PM

Went out to my creek today to fetch some ludwigia for one of my tanks in a comfortable 56F. :D

#4 Guest_IndianaNatives_*

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 06:29 PM

Now this rain is coming through,
at least it's a little warmer now, just a few weeks ago we went camping and now it's hot cocoa weather!
I can't wait for spring 8-)

#5 Guest_BTDarters_*

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Posted 12 November 2008 - 04:56 AM

fishlvr,

I couldn't find a green with envy icon, otherwise I would have posted it here!

IndianaNatives,

I can't wait either!

Brian

Brian J. Torreano - Owner
BTDarters
American Native Fish for
your aquarium...and more!
Web: http://www.btdarters.com
Phone: (262) 268-7489

#6 Guest_Clayton_*

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Posted 13 November 2008 - 11:14 AM

Yeah this rain is getting old really fast. I was really hoping to get out and find some amphipods, but I'm awfully sweet and I might melt.

Need to find a new spot for them anyhow. I've found more sow bugs, nymphs, and leeches than I can shake a stick at, but I can't catch a scud for the life of me. I might just break down and buy a bag of them instead. I'm sure if I do that come spring I won't be able to pull up a net without finding a handful of them.

#7 Guest_Newt_*

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Posted 13 November 2008 - 01:35 PM

Yeah this rain is getting old really fast. I was really hoping to get out and find some amphipods, but I'm awfully sweet and I might melt.

Need to find a new spot for them anyhow. I've found more sow bugs, nymphs, and leeches than I can shake a stick at, but I can't catch a scud for the life of me. I might just break down and buy a bag of them instead. I'm sure if I do that come spring I won't be able to pull up a net without finding a handful of them.


Where have you been looking? My new favorite scud spot is in a spring run with mats of watercress and riccia. Just pull up a handful of that stuff and you'll have so many scuds running down your hand it's like sticking your hand in an ant nest.

Also try leaf-bottomed ephemeral woodland pools. The scud populations in those should be taking off right about now.

#8 Guest_IndianaNatives_*

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Posted 14 November 2008 - 12:36 PM

Happened to find two scuds while I picked up my gravel for my tank,
I didn't know they we're there until they were in the tank, since I didn't know that they were there one got sucked up by the filter :unsure: . I was able to save the other smaller one though, it's a shame too the larger one was about 1/4th in.
Maybe I can get out after this next rain front comes through, I've been busy lately and it's kept me from getting out, plus I'm a wuss when it comes to the cold.

#9 Guest_Clayton_*

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Posted 14 November 2008 - 10:21 PM

I've been running my little bug net through any patch of vegetation or dead leaf debri I happen across. I've also been looking under whatever rocks I happen to be searching under. Maybe I'm in too much current or something. If they are starting to increase in numbers now is probably the time I should be out looking again. I know a few good calm spots that I've been wanting to try out. Next nice weather patch we get I'll probably give them a try.

#10 Guest_Newt_*

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Posted 15 November 2008 - 06:03 PM

I've been running my little bug net through any patch of vegetation or dead leaf debri I happen across. I've also been looking under whatever rocks I happen to be searching under. Maybe I'm in too much current or something. If they are starting to increase in numbers now is probably the time I should be out looking again. I know a few good calm spots that I've been wanting to try out. Next nice weather patch we get I'll probably give them a try.


There are different species in different habitats, and their population cycles aren't identical. I haven't been finding many in streams or swamps either (those populations seem to be more abundant in warm weather), but like I said the spring and woodland pool populations seem to thrive at this time of year. Any pond that supports ambystomatid salamander populations should have plenty of scuds and other microcrustaceans.

#11 Guest_Clayton_*

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Posted 16 November 2008 - 06:23 PM

I can't help but think this is ironic, but I was thinking about what you had said about overgrown woodland pools. Thanks for the tip by the way. I know of a few, but they are back in the Hoosier National Forest and it's a pretty good trek to get to some of them. I had to clear some debris from a storm drain cover so it wouldn't pool up in my yard and noticed the drainage ditch right across the street. It always keeps a little bit of water in it and is absolutely overgrown with some kind of plant. I stuck a ratty old fish tank net in about a half dozen times and must of pulled about 200 scuds out of there. I think some of them are almost big enough for me to eat. I've never seen the salt water varieties anywhere near this size. So I was about to drive 15-20 miles out of my way and hike a few miles to find the little guys when I've apparently got the mother load less than 100 yards from my front door.

Now I just have to figure out how to warm these guys up a little without killing them all. I'm guessing the water out there wasn't more than mid 40's max and the tank I'm looking to culture these in is sitting at 59.2 right now. The other tanks that I'd like to establish them in are a bit warmer.

Edited by Clayton, 16 November 2008 - 06:24 PM.


#12 Guest_Ouassous_*

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Posted 18 November 2008 - 12:22 AM

I think some of them are almost big enough for me to eat. I've never seen the salt water varieties anywhere near this size.


How large are they?

#13 Guest_Clayton_*

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Posted 18 November 2008 - 09:41 AM

At least 3/4"-1" when they are not curled up. I didn't break out the calipers and they were moving a bit much for that anyhow. Big guys and gals for sure. I expected them to be much smaller.

#14 Guest_critterguy_*

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Posted 18 November 2008 - 10:07 PM

way cool! Hope they culture well for you.

The FW scuds I've seen have so far been smaller than the marine sp. I've seen...most being about pinto bean size at best.




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