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Fish species that should be avoided in WI


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#1 Guest_BTDarters_*

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 01:27 AM

Dear NANFAns,

I've compiled a list, based on Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) regulations, of fish that aquarists in Wisconsin should avoid keeping. This is not an official list, though I have submitted it to the DNR, but a general guideline of fish to avoid keeping in the state. Please also avoid protected species and invasive species. For a list of Wisconsin invasives, please click here. For a list of protected species, please click here. Please note, protected species with the designation "SC/N" have no laws regulating use, possession, or harvesting. These fish should be kept with diligence, though, as the DNR is concerned about their status in the state.

Thanks, and I hope this is a help to everyone. If anyone has any questions, please contact me via any of the methods in my signature line below.

Brian


Comprehensive List of Fish Not Native to Wisconsin, but Native Fish to North America that would most likely be viable if released into Wisconsin Waters

Selection Criteria:
  • Fish that are found north of 38 3' North Latitude
  • Fish that are found in mountainous regions that could survive in Wisconsin's climate

Range Map Studies primarily from:
  • Page, L. M., and B. M. Burr. 2000. A Field Guide to Freshwater Fishes: North America North of Mexico. Houghton Mifflin Company, New York.

Prepared by: Brian J. Torreaano Preparation date: 28 Jan. 2010

Centrarchidae (Sunfishes)

  • 1 Mud Sunfish Acantharchus pomotis
  • 2 Blackbanded Sunfish Enneacanthus chaetodon
  • 3 Bluespotted Sunfish Enneacanthus gloriosus
  • 4 Banded Sunfish Enneacanthus obesus
  • 5 Redbreast Sunfish Lepomis auritus

Clupeidae (Herrings and Shads)

  • 6 Blueback Herring Alosa aestivalis
  • 7 Alabama Shad Alosa alabamae
  • 8 Hickory Shad Alosa mediocris
  • 9 American Shad Alosa sapidissima

Cyprinidae (Minnows and Carps)

  • 10 Mountain Redbelly Dace Chrosomus oreas (formerly Phoxinus oreas)
  • 11 Tennessee Dace Chrosomus tennesseensis (formerly Phoxinus tennesseensis)
  • 12 Rosyside Dace Clinostomus funduloides
  • 13 Satinfin Shiner Cyprinella analostana
  • 14 Red Shiner Cyprinella lutrensis
  • 15 Steelcolor Shiner Cyprinella whipplei
  • 16 Streamline Chub Erimystax dissimilis
  • 17 Toungetied Minnow Exoglossum laurae
  • 18 Cutlips Minnow Exoglossum maxillingua
  • 19 Western Silvery Minnow Hybognathus argyritis
  • 20 Plains Minnow Hybognathus placitus
  • 21 Eastern Silvery Minnow Hybognathus regius
  • 22 Bigeye Chub Hybopsis amblops
  • 23 Rosefin Shiner Lythrurus ardens
  • 24 Ribbon Shiner Lythrurus fumeus
  • 25 Sturgeon Chub Macrohybopsis gelida
  • 26 Sicklefin Chub Macrohybopsis meeki
  • 27 River Chub Nocomis micropogon
  • 28 Comely Shiner Notropis amoenus
  • 29 Popeye Shiner Notropis ariommus
  • 30 Bridle Shiner Notropis bifrenatus
  • 31 Bigeye Shiner Notropis boops
  • 32 Silverjaw Minnow Notropis buccatus
  • 33 Silver Shiner Notropis photogenis
  • 34 Swallowtail Shiner Notropis procne
  • 35 Silverband Shiner Notropis shumardi
  • 36 Redside Shiner Richardsonius balteatus
  • 37 Fallfish Semotilus corporalis

Esocidae (Pikes)

  • 38 Chain Pickerel Esox niger

Fundulidae (Topminnows)

  • 39 Plains Killifish Fundulus zebrinus
  • 40 Rainwater Killifish Lucania parva

Ictaluridae (North American Catfishes)

  • 41 Margined Madtom Noturus insignis
  • 42 Brindled Madtom Noturus miurus
  • 43 Freckled Madtom Noturus nocturnus

Lepisosteidae (Gars)

  • 44 Spotted Gar Lepisosteus oculatus

Percidae (Perches & Darters)

  • 45 Eastern Sand Darter Ammocrypta pellucida
  • 46 Greenside Darter Etheostoma blennoides
  • 47 Swamp Darter Etheostoma fusiforme
  • 48 Spotted Darter Etheostoma maculatum
  • 49 Tessellated Darter Etheostoma olmstedi
  • 50 Orangethroat Darter Etheostoma spectabile
  • 51 Tippecanoe Darter Etheostoma tippecanoe
  • 52 Variegate Darter Etheostoma variatum
  • 53 Channel Darter Percina copelandi
  • 54 Longhead Darter Percina macrocephala
  • 55 Sharpnose Darter Percina oxyrhynchus
  • 56 Shield Darter Percina peltata
  • 57 Dusky Darter Percina sciera

Umbridae (Mudminnows)

  • 58 Eastern Mudminnow Umbra pygmaea


#2 Guest_NVCichlids_*

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 07:15 AM

I have asked in the past they always have said that the bluespotted and the bandeds were safe...

#3 Guest_BTDarters_*

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 08:22 AM

I don't know what to tell you, Nate. This was a list I compiled based on the information that they gave me. If they told you specifically that Bluespotteds and Bandeds were OK, then you have to decide what's OK for you to do or not do.

Brian

#4 Guest_FirstChAoS_*

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 11:48 AM

I am suprised they worry about mud sunfish. their so impacted in the northern half of their range I assumed any population being established in the north would be an improvement.

#5 Guest_ashtonmj_*

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 12:22 PM

You're making the assumption that establishing a population of a fish nearly 1,000 miles outside of its native range would be a good thing though...

I think the point of this list is being missed too. Brian compiled an unofficial list of species that he submitted to DNR based on criteria established by DNR. It is not written in stone, he made some best professional judgements to come up with a pretty nice piece of information for Wisconsin's.

#6 Guest_gerald_*

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 03:21 PM

Brian, Would it be appropriate to modify the title of the list to: "North American fish species that should not be kept in WI in conditions where they might escape into streams or ponds" ?? As long as these fish are kept in aquaria or screen-covered outdoor tubs away from natural waters, the danger of escape seems pretty minimal to me.

#7 Guest_mikez_*

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 08:38 PM

What is the current legal status for the species in question?
Was this list made in anticipation of a pending regulation change?

A slippery slope....

#8 Guest_NVCichlids_*

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 09:25 PM

From what I understand, these are all species that COULD survive in Wisconsin waters if for some reason they were released in large enough numbers to get a breeding population.

I believe this to be a work in progress for future legislation, but right now its just a list of fish that have a range of temperatures similar to whats in wisconsin.

#9 Guest_BTDarters_*

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Posted 10 June 2010 - 11:28 AM

You're making the assumption that establishing a population of a fish nearly 1,000 miles outside of its native range would be a good thing though...

I think the point of this list is being missed too. Brian compiled an unofficial list of species that he submitted to DNR based on criteria established by DNR. It is not written in stone, he made some best professional judgements to come up with a pretty nice piece of information for Wisconsin's.


Thanks for the kudos, Matt! A list to help Wisconsinites was exactly what I was going for.

Brian, Would it be appropriate to modify the title of the list to: "North American fish species that should not be kept in WI in conditions where they might escape into streams or ponds" ?? As long as these fish are kept in aquaria or screen-covered outdoor tubs away from natural waters, the danger of escape seems pretty minimal to me.


Gerald,

I don't think that it would be appropriate to change the title. The DNR ruling prohibits even the entry of fish into the state that could survive if released. This includes fish that would be bound for aquaria.

What is the current legal status for the species in question?
Was this list made in anticipation of a pending regulation change?

A slippery slope....


Mike,

If I'm reading your question correctly, the legal status would be "prohibited for transport, possession and the like". I made the list in response to a regulation change that has already occurred. The ruling is Wisconsin Chapter NR40, which took effect Sept. 1, 2009. More info about it can be found here.

Brian

#10 Guest_mikez_*

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Posted 11 June 2010 - 05:49 PM

Ahh, finally figured it out.
Actually you're in good shape for species native to WI. Actually, about the loosest I've seen. No license required for dip netting "rough fish" which include "darters" and "All minnows". :shock:

However this from the invasive rule pretty much makes ALL cold water fish not native to WI PROHIBITED.

"All other nonnative fish and nonnative crayfish except:
a. Established nonnative fish species and established nonnative
crayfish species
b. Nonnative viable fish species in the aquarium trade
c. Nonnative fish species in the aquaculture industry
d. Nonviable fish species"

The non native viable is goldfish and the like.

#11 Guest_mikez_*

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Posted 11 June 2010 - 05:59 PM

Forgot to add a Bait Harvest Permit is required to transport.

#12 itsme

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 11:02 AM

Ahh, finally figured it out.
Actually you're in good shape for species native to WI. Actually, about the loosest I've seen. No license required for dip netting "rough fish" which include "darters" and "All minnows". :shock:

However this from the invasive rule pretty much makes ALL cold water fish not native to WI PROHIBITED.

"All other nonnative fish and nonnative crayfish except:
a. Established nonnative fish species and established nonnative
crayfish species
b. Nonnative viable fish species in the aquarium trade
c. Nonnative fish species in the aquaculture industry
d. Nonviable fish species"

The non native viable is goldfish and the like.

 

If I am reading this correctly, and I have not seen entire rule, this clause lets you off the hook unless you will be stocking outdoors:  "b. Nonnative viable fish species in the aquarium trade".  And when I say "off the hook" I mean in terms of importing non-native viable species to WI.  The key words being "in the aquarium trade".  That is very broad wording that basically says that if you will keep it in a tank, you're good... unless of course there are other, contravening rules.

 

Mark



#13 Guest_BTDarters_*

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 07:50 PM

Mark,

 

Yes the other, contravening rules are the NR40 regs.  That's why I started this post.  Nonnative viable fish species in the aquarium trade are defined by the DNR as:

 

- Koi carp

- Goldfish

- Sterlet

- Chinese Hi-Fin Banded Shark

- Bitterling

- Ide

- Weather Loach

 

Those species may be possessed, transported and transferred, but only in a "safe facility".  A "safe facility" is a container that is never connected to a water of the state, is not subject to flooding, and is not an open pond.  An "open pond" being an outdoor pond that is not entirely covered to prevent the escape of fish.

 

The way we are able to keep any species of fish in the aquarium that is not native to the state is if they are nonviable.  At the beginning of this thread, I posted a list of North-American native fishes you can't keep because it is much shorter than the list of fishes you can keep.  If a Wisconsinite is interested in keeping a North-American native species and it isn't in the list above, it can be assumed that it is safe to keep.

 

Brian






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