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The taste of invasives.


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#1 FirstChAoS

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 10:39 AM

It seems one brewery has found a unique way to help control invasive species. Beer brewed with Milfoil and Zebra Mussels.

Could human consumption control invasives?

http://www.startribu.../283551301.html

#2 Sean Phillips

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  • Allegheny River Drainage, Southwest PA

Posted 25 November 2014 - 11:28 AM

That's one way to handle invasives! For me at Erie, whenever I catch a goby I always feed it to the seagulls, support out natives birds right! Plus if I'm on my boat while doing this I gain some friends that follow us around until we start the engine :).
Sean Phillips - Pine Creek Watershed - Allegheny River Drainage

#3 butch

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 05:23 PM

Doubt it, they don't use zeebs or Eurasian Milfoil for brewery that much. Its a good way to get attention from public about invasive species tho. The regulations still applied so they can only collect the invasive species by a specific lake where the brewery is at to prevent breaking the laws (transporting).

#4 gzeiger

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 09:21 PM

Success at this can only lead to managed populations and systematic stocking :angry:

#5 butch

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Posted 26 November 2014 - 09:52 AM

Doubt it, gzeiger.

#6 gzeiger

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Posted 27 November 2014 - 11:51 AM

Probably not of zebra mussels, but it has happened with bass and trout all over the place.

#7 mikez

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Posted 04 December 2014 - 06:11 PM

On the surface it would seem you could reduce invasive species if you harvest them. I'm not comfortable with that.

Seems there's merit in the theory that if you commercialize invasive species you create a demand that will cause speculators to want to start their own "seed" populations. That's why Hawaii banned the sale of the invasive reptiles.

I've heard scuttlebutt out of Florida that the chameleon trade has created quite a market with dirtbags seeding the suburbs and even fighting over prime areas.
Mike Zaborowski
I don't know, maybe it was the roses.

#8 butch

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Posted 05 December 2014 - 09:41 AM

But then again there's regulations still in effect. You can still get busted if you got caught with transporting live snakehead or Asian carps, even if they are caught by commercially.

#9 NotCousteau

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Posted 05 December 2014 - 10:14 AM

This was just a dumb gimmick. Nothing will come of it.

#10 Matt DeLaVega

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  • Ohio

Posted 10 December 2014 - 03:11 AM

I kind of like it. Let me save Josh Blaylock the trouble (of course you like it Matt, it involves aquatic wildlife and BEER) Seems to me the awareness factor trumps all others. Gimmick yes, but not a bad one. Once these bad guys (the invasives) have established themselves and we know we cannot eradicate them, then we may as well use them. If one pinky nail sized zebra is killed with each bottle sold, that is a start. Granted a very small one, but why not. This is too odd for others to seed local waters to try and duplicate it. Trust me, the average merican guy with his beer belly is not going to be waiting in line for mussels and milfoil, so no copycats.

The member formerly known as Skipjack


#11 mikez

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 02:30 PM

I agree this case seems low risk for intentional releases. I couldn't help bringing up the reptile analogy as the topic has been hot in that community for years. Maybe nobody will seed mussels to make beer, but the idea of planting something to harvest for profit later is still reinforced.
Mike Zaborowski
I don't know, maybe it was the roses.

#12 butch

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 09:21 PM

I asked the entire class in aquatic biology and none of them want to try it as they are super skeptical because they knows what is in the zebra mussels. The article said they only took shells it doesn't say it came from a live one or an empty shell. Judging from the responses, I doubt it that this beer will be popular with drinkers. This specific lake where the brewery is at is a metro lake so its not exactly cleanest lake in the metro area.

#13 Matt DeLaVega

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 09:44 PM

Look how popular microbrews have become. Heck I have a collection of them that I bought simply because of the name and logo. "Sculpin" "Dogfish ale" "Steelhead" They are popular gimmicky beers. I planned on keeping the full six packs as a collection. Did not work. I ended up just keeping the empty bottles in their carton. So I ended up emptying the bottles. No reason to have full beer bottles laying around.

But if you do actually raise some awareness here by tapping into a popular item, then good. The guy that owns the company that produces "Sculpin India Pale Ale" must have some interest in fish? Otherwise where did that come from?

Good for them if they can make an anti-invasive beer, make a profit and make a statement.

Also by the way, I was very wrong about people lining up to buy it. Their whole stock sold out in 7 days.

The member formerly known as Skipjack


#14 mattknepley

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 10:00 PM

Look how popular microbrews have become. Heck I have a collection of them that I bought simply because of the name and logo. "Sculpin" "Dogfish ale" "Steelhead" They are popular gimmicky beers. I planned on keeping the full six packs as a collection. Did not work. I ended up just keeping the empty bottles in their carton. So I ended up emptying the bottles. No reason to have full beer bottles laying around.

But if you do actually raise some awareness here by tapping into a popular item, then good. The guy that owns the company that produces "Sculpin India Pale Ale" must have some interest in fish? Otherwise where did that come from?

Good for them if they can make an anti-invasive beer, make a profit and make a statement.

Also by the way, I was very wrong about people lining up to buy it. Their whole stock sold out in 7 days.

When they come up with an imperial stout, then I'll take notice. ;)
Matt Knepley
"No thanks, a third of a gopher would merely arouse my appetite..."

#15 butch

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 11:05 PM

I have my doubts but this anti invasive beer gimmick sure doesnt grab lot of attention from the public. Another failed awareness.

#16 Matt DeLaVega

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 11:20 PM

Hmmm. Maybe, but like I said they were sold out in a week. A few people with IQ's above average had to think twice about why they just bought beer with a touch of odd ingredients. Maybe not. They just thought it was cool to pay $10+ for a six pack of beer. I would buy it for sure for my collection of fish related beers.

The member formerly known as Skipjack


#17 mikez

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Posted 12 December 2014 - 08:37 AM

We beer drinkers are not known for being chosey about ingredients. Heck one of the largest brewers in the country gets their water from the Merrimack River in NH. I've personally visited at least one wastewater plant upstream on that river, an experience that makes me think twice about that brand, no matter how good their TV commercials.
Mike Zaborowski
I don't know, maybe it was the roses.




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