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World Fish Migration Day?


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#1 FirstChAoS

FirstChAoS
  • Regional Rep

Posted 01 April 2018 - 06:07 AM

I was looking at Amoskeag Fishways calender of events to see what is coming up. It seems their is a world fish migration day. How do you celebrate that? Do you clean a river? Help game wardens stock migratory species fry? remove a dam? 

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#2 Michael Wolfe

Michael Wolfe
  • Board of Directors
  • North Georgia, Oconee River Drainage

Posted 01 April 2018 - 07:12 AM

What would be your favorite migratory fish?

How far do you have to travel to consider it a "migration"? Or is it numbers of fish that have to travel in a group that makes it a real "migration"?


Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin

#3 gerald

gerald
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  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 01 April 2018 - 04:01 PM

Also, how crucial is the migration to the species survival?  Some make very short migrations (e.g., freshwater gobies with a marine larval stage) but cannot survive without it.  Those that migrate up and down rivers but remain in freshwater the whole time (many suckers) at least have a chance of surviving even if their migration is blocked.


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#4 Redfin

Redfin
  • NANFA Member
  • Border of Chicago and Des Plaines Watershed

Posted 02 April 2018 - 10:15 AM

Reading the https://www.worldfishmigrationday.com/website it seems that the day is about ensuring free-flowing rivers so that fish can actually migrate.

 

 

 remove a dam? 

 

So looks like this is the only way to celebrate properly.



#5 gerald

gerald
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  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 05 April 2018 - 10:26 AM

My contribution to World Fish Migration Day: an American eel ladder on a tributary of the Cape Fear River at Hope Mills, NC.  It's been running about two weeks now.  Not sure if any eels have climbed it yet, but eels were seen in the area while the dam was being repaired. Photos were taken before the lake was refilled (obviously).  The receiving cage is now half submerged.

Attached Files


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#6 fundulus

fundulus
  • Global Moderator

Posted 06 April 2018 - 07:48 AM

The answer to FirstChaos' question above is easy: remove a dam or two, especially in New England where there are plenty of "ghost" dams that were useful in the 1840s but do nothing now except to block off habitat. Amoskeag is an interesting place to see fish on the fishway, I will say that.
Bruce Stallsmith, Huntsville, Alabama, US of A

#7 gerald

gerald
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  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 24 April 2018 - 06:00 PM

Just got word yesterday that the first few eels have ascended "my" eel ladder at Hope Mills Dam on Little Rockfish Creek (7 miles SW of Fayetteville NC).  It works! 


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#8 gerald

gerald
  • Global Moderator
  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 29 May 2018 - 02:27 PM

21 May 2018:  30 eels ascended Hope Mills Dam eel ladder, the most so far in one day.  Total eels captured so far since start-up is about 60-ish I think.  Assuming the bucket bottom is 10-inch diam, some of those eels are 7" plus.

Attached Files


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#9 Irate Mormon

Irate Mormon
  • NANFA Member
  • Crooked Creek, Mississippi

Posted 01 June 2018 - 12:31 AM

Nice.


-The member currently known as Irate Mormon





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