Jump to content


Photo

Stock tank?


9 replies to this topic

#1 ncpanfisher

ncpanfisher
  • NANFA Guest
  • North Carolina

Posted 09 January 2019 - 04:00 PM

Has anyone used a stock tank like this one https://www.tractors...hcaAiuAEALw_wcB as a fish tank? I want to start a native tank for pumpkinseeds or blue spots. If you have used a tank like this are there any problems to watch out for?

Edited by ncpanfisher, 09 January 2019 - 04:02 PM.


#2 FishingLucky

FishingLucky
  • NANFA Guest
  • North Carolina

Posted 09 January 2019 - 06:10 PM

I've never had one but I know there are plenty of people who use them. My friend breed minnows is one and never had any issues.



#3 lilyea

lilyea
  • NANFA Member
  • Peace River Watershed, Central Florida, USA

Posted 09 January 2019 - 06:33 PM

Has anyone used a stock tank like this one https://www.tractors...hcaAiuAEALw_wcB as a fish tank? I want to start a native tank for pumpkinseeds or blue spots. If you have used a tank like this are there any problems to watch out for?

 

 

I have two of those 110g stock tanks from Tractor Supply for keeping fish outside.  Currently I have sunfish in one and native killifish in the other.  The tanks have worked well for me and I like the fact that I can drill holes for zip ties etc. around the top edge for plastic potting baskets, wire mesh lid, and more.  Additionally, they seem to hold up to the Florida sun, although I can't speak to their performance in cold or freezing conditions.  



#4 Michael Wolfe

Michael Wolfe
  • Board of Directors
  • North Georgia, Oconee River Drainage

Posted 09 January 2019 - 07:11 PM

Yes, I have three of these (well the Rubbermaid version) in my backyard right now.  They do very well for a lot of natives.  I have water lily or water shield in there and no other filtration or circulation.  They seem to do well for me here in Georgia (sometimes it is very hot, and occasionally it freezes... both conditions need the water to not be circulated, but to naturally stratify). 

 

I have had Enneacanthus and Cyprinella breed successfully in them.


Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin

#5 littlen

littlen
  • NANFA Member
  • Washington, D.C.

Posted 10 January 2019 - 07:19 AM

If I'm not mistaken, you buried/recessed yours in the ground, Michael?


Nick L.

#6 Michael Wolfe

Michael Wolfe
  • Board of Directors
  • North Georgia, Oconee River Drainage

Posted 10 January 2019 - 08:18 AM

Not really. They are close to the back of the house in an area that had no sod. I just raked back the pine straw ground cover and pressed them into the ground about an inch (just the ribs that are on the bottom of these rubbermaids). Then pushed the pine straw back around to make it look nice. I think someone else mentioned burying them a little bit.
Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin

#7 ncpanfisher

ncpanfisher
  • NANFA Guest
  • North Carolina

Posted 10 January 2019 - 08:22 AM

Michael Wolfe, do you shoot bows? You didnt happen to be president of Mt. Pisgah bow hunters at one time did you?

#8 lilyea

lilyea
  • NANFA Member
  • Peace River Watershed, Central Florida, USA

Posted 10 January 2019 - 10:31 AM

IMO, burying the tanks is a trade off between improved temperature control and natural aesthetics vs more difficult maintenance and higher safety risk (especially for children & small animals). I have found that the 110g is enough water that it mitigates fast temp swings.

#9 swampfish

swampfish
  • NANFA Member

Posted 10 January 2019 - 11:15 AM

I use them extensively during the growing season as the lazy guy's fish breeding system. I set them up in April or May and drain them in September or October before they freeze and the fish are killed. With the bung near the bottom, they are easy to drain. They spend the winter upside down. We set them on the ground in the shade to keep them from overheating in the summer.

 

I have one round 1000 gallon tank, seven round 350 gallon tanks, and five oval 100 - 110 gallon tanks. Two of the oval tanks are Rubbermaid, and the walls are thick enough to work well without support. The three other oval tanks have thinner walls that bow to the side when filled with water. This caused the sides to be 2-3 inches lower than the ends. I solved that problem by drilling holes in the top of the sides and bolting a flat, one-inch wide, aluminum crosspiece that i purchased at a hardware store and drilled the ends. I purchased the two oval tanks that were the worst at bowing at Rural King. 

 

Phil Nixon

Central Illinois



#10 Michael Wolfe

Michael Wolfe
  • Board of Directors
  • North Georgia, Oconee River Drainage

Posted 11 January 2019 - 08:55 PM

Michael Wolfe, do you shoot bows? You didnt happen to be president of Mt. Pisgah bow hunters at one time did you?


No and no. Sorry.
Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. - Benjamin Franklin



Reply to this topic



  


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users