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Huge ping-pong ball snail.


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#1 Fleendar the Magnificent

Fleendar the Magnificent
  • NANFA Member
  • Ohio

Posted 29 May 2019 - 03:52 PM

We seem to have an abundance of these at a local reservoir and I find the shells all over the place when the lake is down. Must be a smorgasbord for the trash pandas. I have been wanting one of these big guys for awhile now and this is the first one I have found from the Olentangy River. This specific snail is about or a bit bigger than a Ping-Pong ball and it eats just about anything.

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#2 Michmass

Michmass
  • NANFA Guest
  • Grass Lake MI

Posted 31 May 2019 - 03:29 AM

That's a cool looking critter and scary big. Congrats.


Truths are mutable, facts are not.  Unless of course we're talking about the definition of mutable, then the fact is in fact mutable.


#3 Fleendar the Magnificent

Fleendar the Magnificent
  • NANFA Member
  • Ohio

Posted 31 May 2019 - 03:39 PM

Thanks Mich,

 

I have seen them a bit bigger, but the empty shells only. The lake about 15 miles from here is filled with them. Not sure what species, but they get BIG.

 

Chris M.



#4 Matt DeLaVega

Matt DeLaVega
  • Forum Staff
  • Ohio

Posted 01 June 2019 - 10:33 AM

Viviparis malleatus. Chinese mystery snail. Japanese trapdoor snail.

 

They are livebearers. They were brought to the US and sold in Asian markets.

 

These guys won't overpopulate a tank. The ones I have kept only birthed maybe 20 young in a year, and the offspring are large enough to cull out if you desire.


The member formerly known as Skipjack


#5 Fleendar the Magnificent

Fleendar the Magnificent
  • NANFA Member
  • Ohio

Posted 01 June 2019 - 01:02 PM

@Matt,

Thank you for the information on them. I had one once before about 13 years ago I had caught in that lake. After putting it in my tank, it ate flake food and within 2 weeks there were like 6 fully formed babies. Did a little reading on them and it seems that they're sensitive to water conditions and close up when water becomes poor well before fish are affected. Interesting to know about them.

 

Thanks again.

 

Chris



#6 gerald

gerald
  • Global Moderator
  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 02 June 2019 - 09:14 PM

They are HIGHLY invasive, despite what pondplantsonline says: https://www.pondplan...=19493940658269

https://nas.er.usgs....?SpeciesID=1046


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#7 Fleendar the Magnificent

Fleendar the Magnificent
  • NANFA Member
  • Ohio

Posted 03 June 2019 - 11:07 AM

Once I found out what they are, I figured, like the Asian clam, that they're an invasive. Not much anyone can do about them now. They're everywhere in the local lakes here. When the lakes go down during the summer, the inlets are littered with their shells. Since places like pond plant and others across the country sells them by the hundreds, guess we will never eradicate them either.






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