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Anacharis.


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#1 Casper

Casper
  • NANFA Fellow
  • Chattanooga, TN alongside South Chickamauga Creek, just upstream of the mighty Tennessee River.

Posted 19 July 2019 - 03:48 PM

Anacharis.  Egeria Densa.  Brazilian waterweed.

I know this is what grows lush in the cement pond.  For years now.  

I wish it was native but Egeria Densa is commonly sold in the aquarium trade.

My mass started with a single sprig and has long provided a lush growth providing habitat, oxygenation and filtration.

However...

The last couple years have been problematic.

The pond has always been crystal clear and the many different trees, plants and rushes have taken up the nutrients seemingly efficiently.

But recently, the last 2 years now, after a burst of Egeria Densa growth in the Spring the mass just quits growing.  And the cement pond's water is turning green.

 

I had the water tested the other day and it reads...

7.6 PH

GH 5 Drops

KH 6 Drops

Nitrates 0

I was told this is all good.  The fish appear healthy as well.

 

I do not fertilize the water, and only feed the fish a can ( small soup can ) half full of Purina Game Fish Chow.

The pool measures 18' x 36' and averages 4' deep.

1 pump is running now and feeds a 6' cascading waterfall.  In the Spring i plug in a 2nd pump to augment the riffle run and stimulate spawnings.

In the Winter i only run 1 pump, 2 hours a day, using a timer.

 

Why is the Egeria Densa dying?  My guess the water is turning green is secondary because the Egeria Densa is NOT growing, thus NOT absorbing nutrients.

 

Possible contributing factors:

1) In the 8' bowl shaped deep end there is about 2' of settled silt.  Several years ago i pumped much of it out but it has returned.  I do not think this is a factor.

2) The pump chamber is provided water by 2 loops of perforated field line placed under a 1' to 2' gravel bed.  About twice a year i have to vacuum the gravel bed using a plunge device and pump, purging the vacuumed silty water out into the yard.  This has been a standard maintenance for years now.  But over time it clogs more quickly, and if not monitored risks starving and burning out the pumps in the pump chamber.  In response i have added a couple coarse filtered inlets directly into the pump chamber... thus less water is being filtered by the gravel.

 

Last Summer this occurred and i turned on the 2nd pump and the water seemed to clear... but i risk burning the pumps out if left unattended for a few weeks while i travel.

 

So...

Any thoughts on why the Egeria Densa is not growing?  Disease... i think not.

Does anyone have experience with native Elodea Densa?  Perhaps it is a good time to switch to a native.

 

Beyond NANFA members is there a pond site that is recommended for solutions?


Casper Cox
Chattanooga, near the TN Divide on BlueFishRidge overlooking South Chickamauga Creek.

#2 Matt DeLaVega

Matt DeLaVega
  • Forum Staff
  • Ohio

Posted 19 July 2019 - 04:34 PM

http://forums.pondbo...ds.php?ubb=cfrm

 

Pondboss is geared more towards well managed traditional ponds, so maybe not too much going on directly with anacharis, but there are some pretty sharp minds on forum. Maybe someone will have some ideas. Good luck Casper.


The member formerly known as Skipjack


#3 gerald

gerald
  • Global Moderator
  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 20 July 2019 - 10:18 AM

No idea, but I grow Elodea canadensis and/or E. nuttallii (narrow-leaf Elodea) in my pitcher plant pool, 10 inches deep.  Some years they grow well, others not so much.  The part that freezes in the ice dies, but stems below the ice survive.


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#4 Casper

Casper
  • NANFA Fellow
  • Chattanooga, TN alongside South Chickamauga Creek, just upstream of the mighty Tennessee River.

Posted 22 July 2019 - 01:39 PM

Thanks Gerald...

I sent you a message Sunday.  I would like to discuss directly via phone.

Sunday i got in the pool and the green algae is turning into a "cloud".  Perhaps the beginnings of hair algae.

:(

My thoughts are to add Elodea and see how it does.


Casper Cox
Chattanooga, near the TN Divide on BlueFishRidge overlooking South Chickamauga Creek.

#5 Casper

Casper
  • NANFA Fellow
  • Chattanooga, TN alongside South Chickamauga Creek, just upstream of the mighty Tennessee River.

Posted 31 July 2019 - 12:00 PM

Good advice from Gerald... via phone discussions and some additional research.

Adding crushed oyster shells ( bought from the feed co-op ) via a secondary small hose to slow flow into the waterfall.

Adding floating plants now and later Elodea and Guppy Grass from Gerald when the weather cools.

Pool greened even more recently and then was fairly clear yesterday.  An ongoing oddity.  ???  Egeria Densa continues to die, releases, and floats to surface where i remove the brown green, seemingly dead long strands.


Casper Cox
Chattanooga, near the TN Divide on BlueFishRidge overlooking South Chickamauga Creek.

#6 Casper

Casper
  • NANFA Fellow
  • Chattanooga, TN alongside South Chickamauga Creek, just upstream of the mighty Tennessee River.

Posted 12 August 2019 - 03:54 PM

I serviced the cement pond a bit Sunday, enjoying the cool water in contrast to the sweltering day.  Yard work is out this Summer, i cannot work in the heat.

 

 

Attached File  41-PondCornerSW.JPG   206.81KB   0 downloads

 

I realized i have not shot photos of the pool while in the water.  This image shows the 6' waterfall, built over the pump chamber with the retaining wall in the foreground.  The wall divides the pool into a shallow quarter.  The other 3 quarters slope to an 8' depth in the far end.

 

 

Attached File  42-PondCornerNW.JPG   195.48KB   0 downloads

 

At the NorthEast corner i have suspended a Water Willow.  No soil, just its roots floating free.  I cut back this Willow severely every Fall and it continues with renewed growth absorbing nutrients directly from the pond water.

 

 

Attached File  43-PondSteps.JPG   198.17KB   0 downloads

 

I built these steps from plastic lumber using stainless steel hardware.  The steps are a necessity to enter and leave the pool with minimal risk.  I'm getting old and i hear bones get brittle.

 

 

Attached File  44-PondCypress.JPG   216.63KB   0 downloads

 

I planted this knee-less Pond Cypress when it was about an inch thick.  It is now about 16" in diameter above the base.  I have topped it several times but it continues to grow with great confidence.  I plan to cut it way, way back this Fall.  If it dies so be it.  I'm going for the scarred Bonsai look and have been concerned of its roots possibly penetrating the wall. 

 

 

Attached File  45-PondCornerNE.JPG   188.72KB   0 downloads

 

I made this floating plant retainer from PVC and pool noodles.  I will spray paint it dark green this Winter.

 

 

Attached File  46-PondPlant.JPG   94.67KB   0 downloads

 

I'm not sure what this plant is?  I found it years ago while walking creek gravel bars.  It grows quickly, sending out long reaching runners.  I have to cut it back vigorously every season.

 

 

Attached File  40-PondgravelBed.JPG   205.7KB   0 downloads

 

This is the shallow gravel bed end.  Water is pulled down through the gravel, through plant roots, into perforated tubing leading to the pump chamber.  This gravel bed requires twice annual plunge vacuuming but even still the slotted perforations are clogging with very fine gravel particles.

 

The pool is still green, but i noted that dead strands of Egeria, after floating to the surface, and after a couple weeks, are sending out fresh vibrant green growth at branch intersections.

 

It's an ongoing experiment.  I minimize any fretting, simply trying various options.

 

 

 


Casper Cox
Chattanooga, near the TN Divide on BlueFishRidge overlooking South Chickamauga Creek.

#7 gerald

gerald
  • Global Moderator
  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 13 August 2019 - 10:13 PM

Nice to see what we've been talking about.  Love the noodle corral.  The pink-flowered plant with opposite or whorled leaves is Decodon verticillatus, swamp loosestrife.  Glad to hear the floating bits of Egeria are recovering.  Maybe it just wasn't getting enough light at the bottom in mid-summer due to trees.  The tree you're calling "water willow" is most likely a black willow or silky willow - the two commonest willow trees in NC and TN.  The real "water willow" Justicia americana is not a real willow, if that makes any sense.


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#8 Casper

Casper
  • NANFA Fellow
  • Chattanooga, TN alongside South Chickamauga Creek, just upstream of the mighty Tennessee River.

Posted 14 August 2019 - 12:46 PM

Thanks Gerald.

I have heard the plant referred to as Swamp Loosestrife.

And the Willow ( tree ) is Black Willow.  I have true Water Willow ( plant ) growing and flowering in the shallow end.

 

Still unsure as to the cause of the greening.


Casper Cox
Chattanooga, near the TN Divide on BlueFishRidge overlooking South Chickamauga Creek.




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