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Black-Banded Sunfish (Enneacanthus chaetodon)


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#1 Veritas1980

Veritas1980
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  • Houston, TX

Posted 23 April 2019 - 08:24 AM

I have 11 of them in a 75 gallon with some other native fishes:

 

https://photos.app.g...Cg8oehsh2obyXo8<-video

 

There's red shiners, gizzard shad, a couple sailfin mollies, a couple black-striped topminnows, several gambusia, several inland silversides, and a gaggle of "ghost" shrimp" and some mystery snails I put in for algae control

 

My question is this:

 

How do I trigger spawning? Has anyone ever done this successfully?

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Edited by Veritas1980, 23 April 2019 - 08:27 AM.


#2 gerald

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  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 23 April 2019 - 11:31 AM

Lots of food, including worms and mosquito larvae.  Winter cooling helps, but isn't necessary.  Low GH and low pH also help, but they have bred successfully in harder, neutral wtaer too.  Add a dense clump of moss or similar fine-leaved plant to serve as nesting site.  Also, a dedicated breeding tank; not a community tank.


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#3 Fleendar the Magnificent

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 03:00 PM

How in the world did you keep gizzard shad? They die when they see a net.



#4 Veritas1980

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Posted 24 April 2019 - 10:06 AM

Lots of food, including worms and mosquito larvae.  Winter cooling helps, but isn't necessary.  Low GH and low pH also help, but they have bred successfully in harder, neutral wtaer too.  Add a dense clump of moss or similar fine-leaved plant to serve as nesting site.  Also, a dedicated breeding tank; not a community tank.

 

I was under the impression that they will protect their nests. I could try tossing a spawning mop in there and see if they will spawn on it. I've got the red shiners spawning with no effort on my part, (let me know if you wanna see video evidence) Then I could just put the eggs in a tumbler.

 

 

How in the world did you keep gizzard shad? They die when they see a net.

 

Into the aerated bucket fast, then it was about an hour drive home, 15 second salt tip and into the tank.


Edited by Veritas1980, 24 April 2019 - 10:18 AM.


#5 jeffreyconte

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Posted 25 April 2019 - 06:30 PM

I second Gerald's suggestions, especially the use of a dedicated breeding tank. I am very skeptical that you will have success with a spawning mop, and even if they did spawn the Red Shiners would quickly (immediately) consume the eggs. They'll be watching and ready to swoop in as soon as the eggs appear.



#6 Veritas1980

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Posted 26 April 2019 - 10:36 AM

I second Gerald's suggestions, especially the use of a dedicated breeding tank. I am very skeptical that you will have success with a spawning mop, and even if they did spawn the Red Shiners would quickly (immediately) consume the eggs. They'll be watching and ready to swoop in as soon as the eggs appear.

 

Thanks for the second opinion. I will eventually be removing most of the shad when they get too big, they will probably get into their own pond owned a local aquarium club member. they also may end up being food for a certain predator fish I am raising. so it may be a while before I can get them alone in that tank. would ghost/grass shrimp eat the eggs?



#7 Fleendar the Magnificent

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Posted 26 April 2019 - 01:20 PM

I caught them before(gizzard shad) and had only a 3 minute drive home, let them remain in an aerated bucket until the water temps rose to rom temps and then into the tank. It was dead in 2 hours. Extremely fragile fish.

 

Chris



#8 gerald

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  • Wake Forest, North Carolina

Posted 27 April 2019 - 10:41 PM

 

would ghost/grass shrimp eat the eggs?

probably yes. The male guards the spawning area from rival sunfish, but may not pay much attention to shrimp and other non-fish predators. After the eggs hatch, fry scatter and are no longer protected.  They dont usually defend the free-swimming fry like some cichlids, basses, and bowfin do.


Gerald Pottern
-----------------------
Hangin' on the Neuse
"Taxonomy is the diaper used to organize the mess of evolution into discrete packages" - M.Sandel


#9 Veritas1980

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Posted 29 April 2019 - 06:45 AM

I caught them before(gizzard shad) and had only a 3 minute drive home, let them remain in an aerated bucket until the water temps rose to rom temps and then into the tank. It was dead in 2 hours. Extremely fragile fish.

 

Chris

 

maybe because mine are basically little more than fry.  you can see them in the video

 

probably yes. The male guards the spawning area from rival sunfish, but may not pay much attention to shrimp and other non-fish predators. After the eggs hatch, fry scatter and are no longer protected.  They dont usually defend the free-swimming fry like some cichlids, basses, and bowfin do.

 

thanks for the info.



#10 Fleendar the Magnificent

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  • Ohio

Posted 29 April 2019 - 01:04 PM

@Veritas,

 

Very likely. Extremely young fish survive the trip and trauma better than older fish do. The shad I caught were last years hatch and about 3-4" long.

 

Chris



#11 Matt DeLaVega

Matt DeLaVega
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  • Ohio

Posted 29 April 2019 - 06:46 PM

I think you guys are right about age and transport.  Brook silversides are known to be even more fragile. Look at them and they die. Some have had luck by taking them out of net in a cup of water. Probably not a bad idea with any wild caught fish meant to be kept.


The member formerly known as Skipjack





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