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darters sensitivity?


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#61 littlen

littlen
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Posted 22 September 2015 - 03:40 PM

A noble and cost effective approach. A bass would certainly be a personable fish to enjoy by itself.
Nick L.

#62 Matt DeLaVega

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 05:39 PM

Oh, a couple or more crappie would be quite nice.


The member formerly known as Skipjack


#63 Leo1234

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  • san clemente, california

Posted 23 September 2015 - 07:29 AM

Would a smallmouth bass work? They seem to be the easiest bass to obtain (besides largemouth) and I really like how they look. I actually remember that I got my 150 for the smallmouth bass I had before. Also, could I add a northern Hogsucker?



#64 littlen

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 07:35 AM

Smallmouth is a good choice.  I wouldn't recommend a hogsucker.  Hard to get them enough food, especially with a bass in the tank.  It would very likely starve to death over a long time.  And would likely be the target for the SMB's aggression.  


Nick L.

#65 littlen

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 07:37 AM

Leo, there are a LOT of threads on med/lg tanks with few fish in them.  We have covered a lot of what works well together, and what doesn't.....good ideas on how to set them up, etc.  Search the forum and you should find more than you're able to read in a night on that stuff.  Just saving you some time from having to ask a lot of the same questions.


Nick L.

#66 Leo1234

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Posted 30 September 2015 - 07:06 PM

I'M SHOCKED! I just tested my canister filter before I emptied the water out for a filter change. My results were completely off from the 150. This water was the filter water from when I had all the problems.

Nitrite: 0
Nitrate:0
Hardness: 300
Alkalinity; 120
Ph 6.8

Now for the fun part 

Ammonia: 8.0ppm 



#67 Matt DeLaVega

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Posted 30 September 2015 - 07:22 PM

Has that filter sat turned off for a while? I think their is probably something staring you right in the face, but you have not picked up on it yet. Soon you will smack yourself and won't believe you missed it.

 

If your filter is running, and the water tests that high for ammonia, you tank is not cycled. Your system crashed. The water coming out of you filter should have the lowest ammonia level. Did your filter have loads of snails in it that might have died off? Did a fish get sucked in and decompose?


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#68 Betta132

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Posted 30 September 2015 - 10:29 PM

If the filter was turned off for any major length of time, the useful bacteria in it could very well have suffocated.



#69 Leo1234

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  • san clemente, california

Posted 04 October 2015 - 09:44 AM

I got the 150 set up again and I guess I'm going to attempt a community again. I have 3 swordtails in the 150 to test it out and so far they look really healthy. They have been in there for 3 days so far. Hopefully the filter was the problem. I got new gravel for the tank and new filters for the canister filter.



#70 Doug_Dame

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Posted 05 October 2015 - 07:46 AM

My understanding is that Windex is essentially a 5% ammonia solution, with other stuff added in, probably primarily to make it smell better to humans and to reduce streaking. You certainly would not want that shot directly into the tank.

 

But I'd be concerned about the 80% water change. That's potentially a pretty dramatic change in water parameters. If you are treating the water as if it has chloramine, before the new water hits the tank, you're probably okay on that. But 80% of a 150g tank would be 120 gallons of new water, which is more than two 55-gals drums would hold. How are you handling the logistics of that? Water straight from the tap often has a very low DO content. And depending on where you are, it often is way colder coming out of the tap than your normal aquarium water, so you could have thermal shock for species that are sensitive to that. What is the temperature of your out-of-the-tap cold water ? Are you mixing warm and cold water to approximate the water temp in the tank? If so, are you guessing, or measuring, the temp of the new water? Are you aerating the new water for 24 hours before adding it to the tank?  

 

I will occasionally do a 80% change on a big tank. But when I do, I empty it to 20%, then add new water in batches, never adding more than 50% new water per 12 hour period. For example, with a 150 (ignoring non-water contents), after taking out 80%, there'd be 30 gals of old water. Which means my first partial refill would be no larger than 30gal x 50%, or 15 gal. Fill a 5-gal bucket with not-quite-cold tap water, dechlor in the bucket, pour into tank, repeat two more times. Twelve hours later, 2nd batch would be 45gal x 50%, or approx 4 buckets full. Doing it in slow steps is a nuisance but it gives the fish some time to adjust as the water parms change, and I don't have to obsess about the temp differences or aerating the incoming water for x hours before using it. 

 

Good luck. These kinds of incidents are very discouraging. 


Doug Dame

Floridian now in Cincinnati
 


#71 Matt DeLaVega

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Posted 05 October 2015 - 08:39 AM

Like.


The member formerly known as Skipjack





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