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Known Pumpkinseed Hybrids


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#41 Guest_JDS_*

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 06:02 AM

I'm thinking this is what you get between a green and pseed.



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#42 Guest_centrarchid_*

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 09:05 AM

Exactly what my pumpkinseed (female) x green (male) looked like. And essentially all male as well. Made about 500, grew them to 2.5 inches, sorted for 80 smaller / duller / female looking fish, put them in a pond for a few months and grew them to six inches, took them out thinking we would have some females and every last one of 47 animals sexed was male! We wanted females cause males dead sterile. Redoing and fry will be feminized next go around.

#43 Guest_JDS_*

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 05:05 PM

http://www.mosportsm...luegillmyth.htm


98% will be male. that seem's high. I wonder if he meens just this typ of hybrid.

Edited by JDS, 22 December 2008 - 05:14 PM.


#44 Guest_centrarchid_*

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 10:05 PM

http://www.mosportsm...luegillmyth.htm


98% will be male. that seem's high. I wonder if he meens just this typ of hybrid.


Sex ratio, even when parentals are of the same species can vary greatly. Yes, somtimes the sex ratio between species can favor males such that 98% are male but you can also find matings between the same species that have very different sex ratios. Crosses, like those between redear and bluegill and the previously discussed pumpkinseed x green also produce sex ratios skewed towards males.


The findings regarding the apparent superiority of the pure bluegill versus the green x bluegill in my opinion does not pass close scrutiny. The study sighted in your link did not get hybrid sunfish and bluegill from the same source. The bluegill going into the stocks potentially differed enough to swamp any effects growth performance derived from the hybrid. From my observations regarding bluegill performance, this is more likley than not. I do agree the reproduction of a hybrid population is not adequate to suppurt a quality largemouth bass fishery.

#45 centrarchid

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Posted 03 April 2016 - 09:58 AM

Sure, hybrids exist in nature. It's a question of how important or common (or viable/fit) they are outside of specific transition zones for some species. There's also a large amount of variation in natural populations, and these are not nearly always the same phenomena. Therein lies the rub, to coin a phrase.

In light of what has been found in the last few years, especially with respect to what we consider as humans, hybridization between species despite being infrequent can be very important.  Resultant populations can relatively reshuffle deck resulting in a new population where come key gene complexes or alleles provide some selective advantages that was not possible prior to the hybridization event.  The advantages can even override reductions (temporary) in fertility of the hybrids. At some point the population can then be said to be no longer hybrid once once everyone can be homozygous (with respect to parental species source) for a given set of alleles.


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#46 wargreen

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Posted 06 April 2016 - 01:45 PM

In light of what has been found in the last few years, especially with respect to what we consider as humans, hybridization between species despite being infrequent can be very important.  Resultant populations can relatively reshuffle deck resulting in a new population where come key gene complexes or alleles provide some selective advantages that was not possible prior to the hybridization event.  The advantages can even override reductions (temporary) in fertility of the hybrids. At some point the population can then be said to be no longer hybrid once once everyone can be homozygous (with respect to parental species source) for a given set of alleles.

Centrarchid that is very interesting, there is a river in Arkansas that I read a report on several years ago where Redbreast sunfish were stocked, they completely hybridized with the local Longear, and according to surveys some of the local Longear are larger than populations in other areas and exhibit some Redbreast features.



#47 centrarchid

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Posted 06 April 2016 - 01:58 PM

I am familiar with alleged situation and think it is probably the actual case.  The Redbreast features are evident to my eyes.  This weekend I will be taking a class on a field trip to the same location.  


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#48 wargreen

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 04:55 PM

I am familiar with alleged situation and think it is probably the actual case.  The Redbreast features are evident to my eyes.  This weekend I will be taking a class on a field trip to the same location.  

How did the field trip go, any pics....survey information?






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