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Brackish 20 Long Chesapeake Bay Aquarium


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#81 Chasmodes

Chasmodes
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  • Central Maryland

Posted 15 November 2017 - 08:43 AM

Update:
 
With the 20g long, one thing that I noticed last night, for the first time in months, a piece of Ulva was floating around the aquarium. Somewhere in the mass of red macro, in the middle, I found a little bit attached and growing. That made me smile, Ulva can survive in this tank. After a closer inspection, I found another piece tucked between the oysters. It isn't a lot, but, it's something, surviving, without me adding a bunch more.
 
The Ulva in the 20g high tank of death is surviving, a lot of it too, along with three mummichogs, an unknown number of mud crabs (between 1 and 5, because they almost never come out), and about 8 grass shrimp. Oh yeah, I moved the last small mummichog, a male, from the 20g long to the 20g high tank of death, because, he would have been killed anyway by the blennies. I caught them chasing and biting his tail and it was shredded. I suspect the smaller killi was killed the same way. He was eaten by the gobies and blennies, nothing left of him now. The killi that I moved started courting the two females right away. I misidentified one of the females last month as a male because it started courting behavior. Apparently, mummichogs get even more confused about their own sex as I do trying to ID them. They are all doing well, although, I suspect that they are carriers of the disease that killed my other fish (at least one of them was a carrier). I hope the 20g long is OK, so far so good, no signs of disease (scratching, etc.) by any of the fish.
 
Here are a few videos of the 20g long.  Hope you all like them.  So these videos show an hideous amount of cyanobacteria.  Since I shot them, I've reduced the lights on to about 2-3 hours after I get home for work.  Today is the third day.  So, it is dark in the tanks for most of the day and night.  The result is that most of the cyano has died off.  I will continue until it's gone.  Hopefully, at that point, the macros and other green algae can get a better foothold.  Other than the cyanobacteria, the 20g long is doing well.  Water parameters are perfect.
 
 
 
 
 

Kevin Wilson


#82 Chasmodes

Chasmodes
  • NANFA Member
  • Central Maryland

Posted 15 November 2017 - 08:44 AM

 


Kevin Wilson


#83 Chasmodes

Chasmodes
  • NANFA Member
  • Central Maryland

Posted 20 November 2017 - 11:11 AM

Update:

 

The 20g long cyano problem has been reduced to a minimal amount by cutting back the lighted period to 3 hours per day, darkness the rest (not total blackout though).   The tank looks a lot better.  I went collecting on Saturday, and we caught everything except for pipefish and blennies.  The water temperature on the Bay was 49 degrees, so those species probably already headed out to deep water.  I added a couple colonies of tunicates to the tank along with another attempt at growing Ulva.  I also tossed the old red macro algae for some healthier specimens.  The old was holding it's own, but the new brought a few amphipods to the tank.  I added a couple live razor clams to the 20g high along with some tunicates.

 

Regarding the tunicates, razor clams, and mussels (a.k.a. sea squirts or sea grapes), I'm hoping that they'll help with the detritus, but I may have to purchase some food for filter feeders to keep the alive long term.  Again, this is an experiment.  What works well will continue into practice and what doesn't will be a lessoned learned idea left in the past.

 

Here's a full tank shot video:

 

A little closer in, focusing on the largest cultch:

 

 

 


Kevin Wilson


#84 Chasmodes

Chasmodes
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  • Central Maryland

Posted 20 November 2017 - 11:26 AM

This video is a close up of one of the tunicate colonies.  That's all they do, siphon, blow out waste now and then, and contract when fish touch them.  Still, I think they're cool and really enhance the aquascaping, giving more of the appearance of a living oyster reef.  I will do whatever I can to keep them alive long term.  I will try feeding them over the counter planktonic food for now. 

 

 


Kevin Wilson


#85 NotCousteau

NotCousteau
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  • Minnesota

Posted 20 November 2017 - 06:04 PM

Awesome videos. Love your tank.



#86 Chasmodes

Chasmodes
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  • Central Maryland

Posted 21 November 2017 - 08:20 AM

Thanks NotCousteau!

 

Here are some pictures of the 20g long for those looking for updates and don't have time for videos.  I have a couple more videos that I'll post later today.  I have to do some work on them first.

 

Full Tank Shot:

IMG_8801_zpsairleiqa.jpg

 

Two colonies of tunicates (sea squirts):

IMG_8807_zps1gaaao70.jpg

 

A couple blennies surrounding a patch of green hair algae:

IMG_8812_zps9tgz4mmn.jpg

 

A pair of grass shrimp:

IMG_8815_zps5qob6mx0.jpg

 

A tunicate that found its way into an empty oyster shell.  It was attached to the red macroalgae (gracilaria sp.?) in the foreground.  I have no idea how it wound up in the oyster shell.  My hunch is that either a fish or mud crab moved it there, probably the former.

IMG_8816_zpsx7gfmcxj.jpg

 

A close up of the tunicate colony:

IMG_8820_zpstox17goi.jpg

 

If you zoom in on the center of the above pic, on one of the tunicates is an encrusting bryozoan colony.  I can't tell if it is alive or not.  I don't see tentacles, so maybe not.  I hope it's alive though, that would be really cool.  If it isn't, it is still encouraging because these tunicates probably spent their entire lives at this location, so the chances of me finding more live bryozoans are pretty good.  I'm optimistic.

IMG_8820%20-%20Copy_zpstrfziyjn.jpg


Kevin Wilson


#87 Chasmodes

Chasmodes
  • NANFA Member
  • Central Maryland

Posted 21 November 2017 - 08:41 AM

I finished with the last two videos.  Hope you like them.  Sorry for them being shaky at times.  I was using a tripod and sometimes when you re-position the camera, the tripod sticks even though I loosened everything.  I need to find another way to do it.

 

In this video, you can see a live barnacle at the 50 second mark:

 

I kept the camera focused on the largest cultch in the area where the blennies are the most active.  It is fun to watch them pop in and out of their hidey holes.

 

Thanks for watching and checking out my thread.  I hope you like the videos.  I watch them every chance that I get when I'm away from my tank!

 


Kevin Wilson


#88 dsuperman

dsuperman
  • NANFA Member

Posted 21 November 2017 - 09:05 AM

Enjoyable videos ,thanks for sharing. Yippee yi yay! 



#89 Chasmodes

Chasmodes
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  • Central Maryland

Posted 21 November 2017 - 11:38 AM

Thank you dsuperman!

 

It's funny about that music on YT.  I was checking out the metal, rock and blues songs and just happened to click on this on listed as "other" (I think)... I had to use it  :D/


Kevin Wilson




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